Matthew Day

Matthew Day

Research student & NHS quality improvement advisor. I research the social and cultural production of ‘care’ and ‘expertise’. I am interested in how and when meanings and learning transfer.

Location Ipswich, United kingdom

Achievements

Activity

  • What stood out as important to you about what this team did?

    The team described “Compassion in action”, recognising individual talents and priorities alongside the service delivery; they focused on what can be done and led/supported with curiosity for improvement.

    What role did management and leadership play?

    Management team described looking at...

  • What is a thought, insight or observation that has stuck with you from this week?

    Yerkes-Dodson law diagram and diary activity encourages you to consider wellbeing in the moment and over time. Using the tool as a diary could create opportunities to reflect on personal wellbeing at moments of need while also creating a resource of data-over-time to examine...

  • Hello my name is Matthew. I work in the NHS as a Quality Improvement Advisor. It is not unusual for clinical teams to propose projects to improve the wellbeing and experiences of staff as QI projects. I am passionate about staff wellbeing and look forward to developing my knowledge further in this area.

  • Adopting new ways of working usually requires three minimal components:

    1) CAPABILITY - this is often the reason for training; to ensure someone has the enabling knowledge and skills to enact certain desired behaviours/completed particular tasks/make certain decisions- they must be capable to do so;

    2) They need OPPORTUNITY for the enactment of the new...

  • Oh no. This often happens when the PowerPoint is doubling up as the lesson plan for the facilitator. Unfortunately, this also tends to result in all the explanatory notes being put on the slides in huge blocks or long lists… and these slides often grow like giant snowballs as facilitators add more content over time but will not/can not remove any of the ‘core...

  • Thank you for sharing this. You described that you felt the learning was only reinforced after the practical - having a practical spaced out the learning experience and (hopefully) applied and mixed (or “interleaved”) the content within different relevant clinical contexts and your broader learning. This would allow you an opportunity for practice with...

  • The application context of the learning should be informing our lesson plan (and training strategy). Think about fire training; hopefully staff are not regularly coordinating an evacuation. However, if an incident occurs, lives will depend on individuals being able to retrieve fire safety knowledge and skills sufficiently. What sort of post-course activities,...

  • Sometimes content overload is driven by the idea that certain things ‘must be in the PowerPoint’ and ‘must be said’, as a mechanism/ritual to try and build some defensive assurance. However, this can quickly become outright counterproductive to creating learning experiences that meaningfully transfer into practice. I tend to see this happening when there is no...

  • I particularly like this concept too. I often find that trainers (especially trainers who are also subject-matter-experts) can get very passionate about extra very specific details. By clearly identifying what is necessary and being critical about what is ‘helpful on THIS course’ we can sieve out some of our treasured but ultimately superfluous details. I like...

  • This course has been a good reminder to increase my own reflective practice and to more critically question and challenge my own thinking, responses, mental models, and daily habits to identify opportunities for development. Thank you.

  • Poor workplace - Lack of competent leadership: decisions seemed to be made based on popularity, preference, and short-term (often personal) gains rather than any form of clearly defined decision-making, evidence-informed rationale, or even a clear alignment to overarching strategy/objectives.

    Good workplace - (1) Autonomy, having freedom to plan my own...

  • Hello, my name is Matthew. I am a postgraduate researcher and Quality Improvement Coach working in mental health services.

  • This is a good example of how learners’ self-assessments can be off the mark. Often, following some intensive training or a thorough briefing, learners may honestly believe that they ‘get it’. However, if we think back to ‘step 1.4: What happens in the brain when we learn?‘, new knowledge is better retained when it is retrieved after a delay (ideally multiple...

  • Hi Cecilia, I cannot recommend enough how valuable it is to explore all the options and features available from the platform(s) you use. Most learning and communication platforms have lots of free online training, guide videos, and forums with bustling communities for support - get the most out of them. However, when it comes to making changes, do so...

  • Learning styles along with many popular self-reporting personality tests that claim to neatly divide all of humanity into a handful of boxes, deserve your suspicion.

    They usually exploit the fallacy of personal validation and frequently harbour a range of hegemonic assumptions and biases.

    These social constructs lack reliability to meaningfully inform...

  • With the limited time available, you are offering an opportunity to practise skills with instruction and feedback. It is also great to read that you are considering the ‘transfer of learning’ into clinical practice. In week five, this course will focus on evaluation and provides some resources and models to help measure such transfer.

    In this example, it...

  • The emphasis on ‘real-play’ for more authentic opportunities to practice is an excellent approach to try out the models ‘safely’ with more authentic contexts; it prepares you to test them in practice during the fortnight between. By spacing the learning in this manner -providing the opportunity for the application of the new knowledge and skills in practice...

  • Hi Andrew, this is a good example of breaking down a complex procedure and spacing practice. What is particularly good about your approach is that you do not leave the learning fragmented, there is an opportunity to apply the components with context. What methods do you use to ‘bring it all together’ and how do you feedback performance constructively for your...

  • I wonder if the experience of ‘awkwardness’ is a reaction to feeling exposed to injustice and the recognition (at least to some extent) of how we all participate in and are affected by the social and power dynamics surrounding SJEDI. Even more reason to speak up in these moments, acknowledge the issue, connect with each other, and respectfully share our...

  • I agree. For me it highlighted the importance of psychological safety within a team. Shutting down such conversations can send a message that sharing something meaningful (even upsetting or anxiety provoking) and acknowledging its impact to individuals and communities is not appropriate at work when this clearly should not be the case. It may also suggest that...

  • Hi, my name is Matthew. I am a researcher and quality improvement coach working in the NHS. I have led a small specialist team of educators for about 5 years in my role before becoming a full-time QI coach. I now dip in and out of different services to support the forming of project teams and the planning, testing, and measuring of ideas for improvement. I...

  • Health and social care touches at the heart of our shared human experiences. Your own lived experiences can grant a sincere compassion and deep empathy for those in your care. You have reminded me how important it is for us to also take time for self-care, reflection, and maintaining personal and professional support networks. Thank you for sharing; I am glad...

  • Thanks for sharing this. A good example that demonstrates a connection between practice, individual learning, organisational learning, and patient safety. (Reason, J., 2000. Human error: models and management. BMJ 320:768–70. doi: 10.1136/bmj.320.7237.768 - for those interested in the ‘Swiss Cheese Model’)

  • A great comment. Often the ‘evidence’ found in differing sources of data are both identified and interpreted through explanatory ‘mental’ models. As educators, what strategies could we use to better understand our learners’ current associations of knowledge and the meanings that inform their current practice? How could we produce ‘active learning’ that safely...

  • I really like that you have explored how technology could be leveraged to enhance access for staff and as a means to enhance patient participation through co-delivery. With the appropriate safeguards, such an intervention would likely provide a rich interface between lived experiences and clinical expertise. The key will be how such an experience is threaded...

  • Establishing a clear framework for evaluation (particularly evaluation over time) will provide valuable insights on the impact of training/other learning design. It could support processes of quality assurance and inform future developments of the learning design; as you will have established a ‘live’ baseline from which to start measuring improvement/impact....

  • This could be an example of the ‘illusion of learning’ described in this section - sounds like you did well to mitigate this by providing exercises that tested learners to ‘show how’. There are a range of studies that lead us to be cautious of learners’ assessments of their own learning. Students may find a teacher charismatic or enjoy particular discussions...

  • This is a really good point and highlights the benefits of building an awareness of your learners’ current understanding/competence in relation to the prerequisites that are required for the content you will be delivering to them. It may be that a learner needs a particular level of understanding of X and Y for our examples and demonstrations about Z to make...

  • I really like this Zoe. A good example of providing opportunities for learners to apply their knowledge and skills into different clinical contexts through reflection on past authentic clinical practice and having the chance to test themselves in safe simulated/roleplay exercises. When you said ‘teamwork’ is this referring to how we embed opportunities of...

  • Thanks for sharing. Sadly, it is not unusual for the transfer of expertise to lose its value amongst the competition of objectives forced on clinical staff. I am glad to hear a colleague committed the time to work with you and re-demonstrate. How did you manage to continue to build and maintain your confidence after this?

  • Person-centred quality improvement. This is a great example of personal and organisational learning. Tell us more, how have you gained confidence/measured that the changes made have been an improvement?

  • This comment resonated with me. Thank you for sharing your thoughts @janetsutton. I agree, we should try and do more than simply talk about topics. So much can be gained by sharing experiences meaningfully through a dialog that connects learning interventions with practice or situates learning within practice. I have frequently gained direction for my designs...

  • What a great mix of skills to bring as an educator!

    I have experienced lots of benefits from using “roleplay” on my more practical courses. I tended to describe it as simply “practice”, announce “let’s put it all together” or “run through a set piece so you can see what it’s like” (I wonder: why do people hate the term ‘roleplay’?) I would introduce this...

  • You reminded me of the Deming quote “If you can't describe what you are doing as a process, you don't know what you're doing.” I am the same, with Deming’s comment in mind, I often sketch out diagrams to associate topics on a course I am completing. When teaching a particular process, I may present content with an (uncluttered) diagram or selected images to...

  • I experienced this as well. eLearning provided both protection from infection and aimed to retain access to content. But does simply doing the eLearning result in learning that transfers into practice? If we consider the the concepts in this section, it may be productive to consider how eLearning could be used as part of a learning design that extends over a...

  • I remember when the vaccination hubs were being established, at pace. For these to be productive there was a careful balance of ‘teaching’ individuals to fulfil more complex roles such as the vaccinators and site coordinators. While other roles relied on just-in-time learning. These supporting roles, often fulfilled by volunteers, were ‘told’ a process of...

  • Great. What was it about your experiences learning on placement and in preceptorship that made the difference?

  • A thoughtful and considered answer. Is an enjoyable learning experience a good indication that it is an effective learning experience? Perhaps not… I agree with you: as trainers we need to wield appropriate and effective teaching strategies with consideration for the impact on ‘user experience’.

  • A good point. Often refresher training can be valued as an end-in-itself. That the process of attending the same or an abridged version of a course a year or so later, provides assurance. However, your comment very astutely describes how refresher training may be of far more value as an opportunity to assess what has been retained and is being transferred into...

  • Great comment. Spacing learning with practice allows for opportunities to retrieve the content in different contexts. This encourages the learner to abstract the knowledge and skills to transfer them beyond the context and examples where it was originally taught; this can increase retrieval strength and understanding of the underlying principles. In short:...

  • Thank you for sharing this. A good example of being mindful to not overload with too much language. Your visual aids are supporting your spoken ‘worked examples’ of practice. Extra written text could be used when you are not there to explain the processes and procedures (perhaps in a job aid available after the course).