Jason Stephens

Jason Stephens

Dr. Jason M. Stephens is an Associate Professor at The University of Auckland. His research focuses on academic motivation and moral development, particularly as it relates to cheating behaviour.

Location Auckland, New Zealand

Activity

  • Yes, this case, involving a Dutch social psychologist, is among the most awful of cases of misconduct by a professor... Though, sadly, there are many more:
    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/240222.php
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/7972604/Marc-Hauser-monkeying-with-the-truth.html

  • @khaliltis Please post any questions you have in this forum.

  • I really like the range of responses here, and particularly like the way many of you have made an effort to define what integrity means to you. Obviously, integrity is a word that I have read and thought about a lot. One of my favourite ways to describe it is to think about integrity as integration -- an integration of values, beliefs, and action. In other...

  • Welcome from the Netherlands, Kristian. I have been your country many times, and always with my bicycle! Yes, people take this course for many different reasons. As noted, one of which is to practice English language skills. As an educational psychologist, I can you and everyone out there that one of the best ways to learn is to do so by doing. That is,...

  • Welcome, Maria. We've had tens of thousands of learners on this course over the past four years, but not sure we've ever had a professional chef! Glad you've chosen some time to take this course--I only wish you could cook us something;->

  • Good to hear it, Chase!

  • Welcome from Ukraine, Oksana, where it is clearly very cold! Thankfully for me, it is summer in New Zealand and we're enjoying a warm, sunny day;->

  • Welcome, Lojel. Glad to have you here from Vancouver by way of the Phillipines, which sounds beautiful!

  • Welcome, Noor. Good to have a doctor on board!

  • Good day, everyone, and welcome from wherever you may be in the world! I'm always delighted by the great diversity--geographic and otherwise--of the learners on this course, and I appreciate the opportunity to be your Lead Educator.

    If you have not done so already, please take a few minutes to complete the course survey (mentioned in the Week 1 Welcome...

  • Indeed, Kristian. I believe that potential employers will appreciate your commitment to achieving with integrity!

  • Good to hear it, Donna.

  • Yes, you should;->

  • Welcome back, Muhammad! We're glad to see you have back for more learning about integrity.

  • Great question, Quek! It's a bit of difficult question, but here's the basic idea. When one is writing an academic paper (but especially literature reviews or research papers), one needs to provide a reference (evidence) for any empirical claims or statements. For example, if I write, "most students cheat", I'm making a statement of fact, and I need to...

  • Welcome to the course, Mark. Good to see someone from Auckland joining us!

  • Greetings, one and all. As always, it's great to see so many people from so many places around the world! As you can see, I live and work in New Zealand, but I was born in the USA -- in the very small State of Vermont. I've been fortunate to travel around the world and call Auckland my home for the past five years. I'm delighted you've chosen to take this...

  • Yes, a variation on this theme, is the "file draw problem" -- studies that don't support one's hypotheses or return null findings from an experiment, simply get filed away and never published. This creates a bias in the published literature, and is problematic... https://jfedrmb.wordpress.com/2012/02/03/why-is-the-file-drawer-problem-a-problem/

  • it does, but quite rare on uni exams. more common, in the USA, on really high stakes tests like the SAT.... http://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-perfect-score-cheating-on-the-sat/

  • great quote, richard!

  • Well, I don't know if "misleading" is the best word here. As stated above I think one or two of them could be worded more clearly....The point here is that in academia we prize the develop of ideas and research, and this requires building thoughtfully on the work of others. So, when using the ideas, words, or research of others, you should cite/quote and...

  • Hi all, thanks for the critiques of the quiz items. I agree Q5 is problematic. It should read "cite" not "quote" and we will edit this question in future runs. Q6 could also be re-worded for greater clarity...

  • Again, I want to emphasise that this don't mean you cannot use ideas or words (even written pages) from previous courses or publications. It's just that one must do so wisely (building, not recycling, knowledge) and ethically (referencing that work, and getting permissions if the use is extensive). I have had many students over the years that you sought my...

  • Great to see the sustained interest in this important topic. To be clear: I did not say that learning is compartmentalised or that one can not use ideas gained in one course (or other area of life) and use them another course. Indeed, as a lecturer, I strongly encourage such "transfer." However, this must be done ethically. I can not, for example, take an...

  • Hi Carol, I just wrote the following in response to Lindsay (down the discussion stream):
    ...I find that a lot of my students are also unfamiliar with the concept of "self-plagiarism." But it is exist, and happens all too frequently! So, just to be clear, if I am writing an article and want to use a sentence or paragraph from an article I wrote earlier, I...

  • Hi Lindsay, I find that a lot of my students are also unfamiliar with the concept of "self-plagiarism." But it is exist, and happens all too frequently! So, just to be clear, if I am writing an article and want to use a sentence or paragraph from an article I wrote earlier, I would have to quote myself (just like I was quoting someone else). Similarly,...

  • Thanks for the comments, Barbara and Rachael. Yes, academic dishonesty encompasses a very wide range of behaviours -- copying homework/lab reports, unpermitted collaboration on assignments or exams, use of unpermitted notes during a test or exam, fabrication of data or false excuses, etc. This MOOC will discuss some of these (and some of the skills and...

  • Thanks for your comments and queries, Wayne, Jayne, and Carol. Per Wayne's first question, I'm not sure how much academic integrity varies -- at least, conceptually. That is, I think most/all institutions subscribe (implicitly if not explicitly) to the values described in the FVP. The FVP is part of the International Center for Academic Integrity, based in...

  • Hi everyone, welcome to the course and thanks for introducing yourselves! It's great to see so many people from so many places -- and each concerned about academic integrity! I look forward to learning more about you and your thoughts on the ideas we'll discuss in the weeks ahead. Thanks again for sharing and I hope you find this course both useful and...

  • Thanks for the compliment, Allah. While I'm not sure if my accent is worthy of emulation, but you and all learners on this course should be able to download all the videos and other resources. Thanks again, Jason

  • Here's how I distinguish the two: You paraphrase a part, you summarise the whole. In other words, if what you've written is meant to describe/overview/review the whole of the article, chapter, book, etc. you've read, then you have summarised something. If you've only attempted to explain a piece of it (an idea or finding), then you've paraphrased.

  • Good question, Steven. Sorry I didn't address it directly in my response. No, I don't you would be sued. However, if you publish something in a journal or book, you generally sign over your copyright to the publisher. In other words, you no longer own the work, which of course heightens one's culpability for self-plagiarism. Again, I don't you'd get sued by...

  • Hi all, the concept of self-plagiarism can be a tricky to grasp. Here's the short of it: Writers do not often retain ownership ("copyright") of what they have written. Almost everything you read is owned by the publisher--not the author--of the work. If I, for example, am writing an article and want to use a sentence or paragraph from an article I wrote...

  • Hi Alan,
    I appreciate your concern with the semantics here. We used the word "should" because those are the guidelines for APA's manuscript style. So, yes, there is a hidden conditional clause: To integrate quotes correctly using APA, you should....
    While I make this point very clearly in the opening of the video, it is not spelled out above. Sorry this...

  • Hi Santiago, the answer to your questions really depend on the manuscript style being used. The guidelines spelled out above are for the APA (American Psychological Association) style. Other styles have different rules concerning the treatment of quotes (italics, different fonts, etc. such as you've suggested).
    Hope this helps,
    Jason

  • Nice to see some back and forth on this important issue. As Ahmet suggest this set of strategies (divide and conquer!) can be very effective, and, importantly, are often permitted or even encouraged by lecturers/professors. There may a few out there that prohibit such collaboration, so do check if it's in question. As Daniel alludes to in his post, the...

  • Hi Maria, sorry for the delay in responding to your great question! As Teacher Faith describes in her post on 13 FEB, there are several strategies that one might use to support a student with a disability. There are, of course, many types of disabilities (physical, learning, etc.) and each requiring different types of management to negotiate. For example, I...

  • Great stuff, Netta and Kelly. I think many students (particularly those just starting university) feel they have to be original -- to be first to say or do something -- but academia (and being educated) is much more about understanding the works (and words) of those that came before you and building on them -- extending them to new realms or contexts,...

  • Hi Teacher Faith, what you're describing here is "contract cheating." Sadly, this happens a lot these days, typically via online essay writing sites, where students pay a fee for someone else to write original, individually-tailored essay for them (a "shadow scholar"; see http://chronicle.com/article/The-Shadow-Scholar/125329/) This kind of...

  • No. It might be collusion (unpermitted collaboration) if you were instructed to do all the work independently (then the discussion you mention would be cheating, even if you wrote up the solution independently).

  • Good question, Keke. Lecturers/professors will vary greatly in terms of what is expected (and what is prohibited) when working in groups. Thus, the best way to ensure AI is to seek clarification from your lecturer/professor about their expectations (and prohibitions)....

  • Most welcome, Lauren. Hopefully, you don't have to pay for it! I'm not 100% but I hope it's free...