Peter Wheeler

Peter Wheeler

I am a researcher at the University of Southampton and an educator on @UoSFLPortus. Interested in all things visual and web technologies

https://twitter.com/Peter__Wheeler
http://about.me/peter_wheeler

Location Southampton

Activity

  • Hi both, as it is part of their degree there are a number of projects for choose from. Including one close to Southampton which is free. Each project is heavily subsidised for all the students but there is a fee to be paid depending on the project.

  • Thank you for your kind comments Juliet.

  • Thanks Dragana. I learn something new!

  • Hi, yes those are the months that archaeological and conservation work is carried out on site. I am not sure exactly why they are closed though. We are unaffiliated with this site so I am not sure whether the information is totally correct. According to this page it is recommended to book: http://www.navigareilterritorio.it/en/explore/guided-tours/. Anyway, I...

  • Hi David, thanks for completing the survey. Dragana will gladly answer any questions you may have relating to the fieldschool. Please use her email that is provided on the application process page and she will get back to you as soon as she can. Thanks, Peter

  • Hi Sheila, yes it is possible. You can visit part of the site that is own my the state and where we are able to work. You should be able to find all the information you need here: http://www.navigareilterritorio.it/en/visit/opening-hours/ . As it says, if you wish to have a guided tour then it is recommended to book. Peter

  • Thank you all for your kind comments. It's been a pleasure to guide you all through the course and try to be as insightful as possible. Portus is a very unique place and I am glad that we can share its wonders with as many people as possible. I hope you follow the exploits of the Portus Project in the future our work continues. You can do so here on the...

  • Hi Juliet, hopefully this will live up to the mark! See my comment below to June with regards to the Hadrian's Wall course. Enjoy the course! Peter

  • Hi Pattie, you're very welcome to participate in the field school! It is running this year in June and coordinated by Dragana. It caters for everyone of different backgrounds so no archaeological experience is necessary. You'll be able focus on any of the topics that you have seen during the course so it isn't all just about digging in the field. You can find...

  • Yes, it most like would have been an aqueduct of some substantial size. We have evidence in Building 3 (see step 6.4) and the adjacent rooms of the Imperial Palace for lead piping. It is quite possible that these connected to the cisterns to form a water system. Perhaps for use in the nearby latrines (step 6.3).

  • Re Opus Sectile: you probably saw it a few times without noticing. It is basically a type of mosaic flooring that we find. A very good example from Ostia is on our Flickr: https://flic.kr/p/qT7ecC The mosaic is made up of thousands of tesserae. An example from our own finds at Portus: https://flic.kr/p/nitWik

  • Hi Catherine, good question. On current evidence we think that the cistern would have stored water for use in the Imperial Palace and or perhaps the dockside area that it resides on. Water would not have come from the aqueduct. It most likely collected run off water using some sort of system, though we are not quite sure of that yet.

  • Hi Susan, I hope you are better and that you can enjoy the course even if you're starting late. Best, Peter

  • Hi Nancy, yes it counts characters. We are not looking essays so short and succinct are the best approach. Alternatively you can write the first half of your comment and then use the reply feature to add the second. Though really, no need to go to such length. Best, Peter

  • Hi Fotini, yes the subtitles for the videos are created automatically by computer. In general I think it does a fantastic job but sometimes even it gets confused.

  • Hi Donna and Brendan, in response to your surprise at there being a lack of accommodation I'll quote something the undergraduates hear quite a few times during their studies - "absence of evidence is not evidence of absence". That is to say that just because we have not found such evidence does not mean it is not there. We may not have looked in the right...

  • Just for your information, the monographs of work done by the Portus Project are published by Oxbow books. The first: https://www.oxbowbooks.com/oxbow/portus.html and second: https://www.oxbowbooks.com/oxbow/rome-portus-and-the-mediterranean.html. Though the second does contain a number of Italian papers.

  • HI Judi, I think what you describe in this comment is exactly what we wish to achieve in this course. It is important for everyone to have their own ideas and understanding of Portus. Providing this course has hopefully allowed for others to use the archaeological evidence we have so far to enlighten themselves about a very important port in the Roman world....

  • I learn something new...

  • It depends on whether the finds are going to be studied by a specialist. A large proportion of them are kept at the BSR, which can then be accessed by the specialists. To my knowledge they are stored in large sheds/storage containers.

  • Hi Sue, some great questions there. First, yes it is a database system that is openly available. That means any project could use the software to create their own database. The database itself is stored at a number of locations for backups. The one we use on site is local because the internet reception is not very good on site. This then get backed up after...

  • Good question, Brian. Yes, each tray is tagged and marked with a single context number. What you see on the wash bed is from a few trays of the same context, so no pottery gets mixed up. Once dried, they are then placed back in the same trays and brought back to the casale (the finds hut) .

  • It's from hunting that the Duke would have done when he owned the land. As far as I know there was no real fighting in the area during WW2.

  • Sorry David, unfortunately that is the reality of the archaeological evidence that we have. These are the types of finds that come out of the ground during our excavations. And these are the exciting pieces! They provide us with a lot of information.

  • In archaeology it is referred to as sherds, short for potsherds. Shards has become an alternative as its a more popular word - meaning a sharp piece of something, like glass.

  • Good question. We don't quite know what kind of activity there was around the site prior to Claudian harbour building. Pottery sherds of cerca 4-3 century BC were found in the 2005 survey in the area between the Hexagon and the Tiber, and excavations of the Via Campana further east have turned up material of similar date. So some activities took place at the...

  • Hi Patricia, sorry for the late reply. Yes, everyone is very friendly and they support each other in learning. The fieldschool is indeed an annual event. It is running this year in June. It is run by the fantastic Dragana and is for everyone of different backgrounds so no archaeological experience is necessary. You can find out more here:...

  • Hi June, welcome to the course. I know Hadrian's Wall course was very good so I hope you enjoy Portus as much. You might be interested in the document that I created at the end of week showing the related steps between the two courses. It's here for your convenience: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/portus/6/comments/26368584/

  • @StevenBliss great question. I think these theories are still being worked on at the moment so I actually don't really know. In reality theories can change a number of times over a short periods. These datasets help that process by allowing Simon, Dragana or Fabrizio (you'll meet him later) to review the archaeological evidence accurately and consistently and...

  • Hi Lynne, glad you enjoyed this week. Thanks for highlighting that error. The video transcripts are automatically created I think but I will try to get it changed. It is correctly spelt in the PDF transcript.

  • @johannaburfitt-williams sorry, sometimes its hard to distinguish humour in these comments. I know, being from Ireland, that the Irish migrants are quite susceptible to it when they travel to Australia on their 2 year work visas. There has been quite a spike in recent years.

  • Hi both and below to Judi. Yes I agree that the Kubity was an excellent way to view models in the Rome course. Although in theory we could use such a feature it would be quite an expense to implement, especially for just one or two steps here. Secondly, Grant's models are actually quite complicated and large compared to those you see in the Rome course. They...

  • If I remember rightly, some of the analysis done suggested that it would have been timber framed and tiled, as concrete may have been too heavy to support.

  • Very well spotted Hugh, I honestly don't have an answer for you. I was always certain it was 12 bays and I know there is Building 7 in close proximity to the north which we do not really understand the function of and its relationship to Building 5. But yes, I see your confusion. I'll try to get an answer for you.

  • You're most welcome, happy to help.

  • Hi Johanna, it's definitely not irrelevant. We take health and safety seriously on site. That includes wearing appropriate clothing and protection. Everyone is told to bring hats and sunscreen to site everyday. Obviously we can't force them to wear it but we advise them and most take heed. It can get very hot during the day so we use the parasol pines (you see...

  • Hi Dorothy, good question. In short, no I don't think we can say there is. There are so many factors that contribute to the depth of soil that you cannot really relate one place to another. Regardless, we wouldn't use the depth of soil to distinguish two different contexts. The ways described in the articles would be far more reliable and give us a better...

  • We still have nearly two full weeks to go, Betty. I wouldn't say nearly finished! The best is yet to come.

  • Great question Colin. We discuss the decline of Portus in the last few weeks so you'll get a more detailed explanation from Simon and Dragana. But for now, perhaps think of the opposite cycle of events - the decline of Rome leading to the silting up of the basins. Maintaining and running a huge infrastructure like Portus would take considerable organisation,...

  • We at the project have mixed reactions to this video. On the one hand it is visually quite nice and does give a good sense of the overall size of Portus, especially for a visitor. On the other hand pretty much all the buildings and the layout of the port are extrapolated from Gismondi plan's of the 1930s. Simon speaks about these in step 1.14 and you can see...

  • Hi Brendan, sorry I missed this. Here is a quick video where Dragana talk a little bit more about slaves and work force. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icmX8NIJFsM

  • Welcome to the course Inibokum. Glad you could join us. Will definitely be a little different from business management.

  • Hi Judi, yes they were. They were undergraduates completing an essential part of their degree course. They must complete a certain amount of weeks of fieldwork after their first year of study.