Mark James Johnson

Mark James Johnson

Mark works in the Health and Care Department at the IFRC in Geneva. He is also the coordinator of the IFRC's MOOC project.

Location Geneva, Switzerland

Activity

  • Hi Christine - to be clear, the preferred situation would be to get someone else to get help while you provide CPR. If this is not possible, we encourage calling the emergency services on speaker phone allowing you to provide CPR whilst you call for help. Finally, if non of these options are possible and you will need to leave the person who is not breathing...

  • Well done Jacqueline and thank you for sharing your experience with us.

  • Excellent replies everyone - as many have said, there are alternatives to help you provide rescue breaths in a safe manner. If you do not have the equipment available, then you will need to make an assessment in the moment and decide whether there is a risk to you or not. We recommend giving rescue breaths if you can as there is evidence of their effectiveness...

  • Thank you for sharing your experience Alison - you should be very proud of your actions.

  • Hi Melvin - Geraldine is correct. An important principle of first aid is to ensure that you do not put yourself in harm's way. You will need to carry out your assessment and make a decision in the moment. However, if you can not give rescue breaths, every effort should be made to provide chest compressions - however, again, ensuring that you do not put...

  • Hi Melvin - thanks for the question. Unfortunately, we can't address serious injuries on this course. If you are interested in more advanced first aid techniques, we encourage you to sign up for a practical course.

    We will learn about the actions to take in the case of bleeding on this course - for serious injuries where there is a risk of the person losing...

  • Hi Matthew - yes, as you say, things have certainly moved on and we certainly wouldn't recommend holding a child upside down by their ankles. Not least, because the evidence shows that the technique of laying an infant on the arm is far more effective. Whilst an emergency situation can be scary, we hope that this course will help first aiders to stay calm,...

  • Fully agree Mariagrazia

  • Hi Chrishanth - if you are interested in learning more, please do contact your local National Red Cross or Red Crescent Societies to see if they provide practical first aid courses.

  • Thank you for your feedback Karen.

  • Hi Sameerah - do remember that if someone is showing signs of choking, they are indeed responsive. And therefore the actions should be followed as shown in the choking steps. Only when the child or infant is unresponsive and not breathing should the first aider provide CPR.

  • Yes Sophie, you are correct. We recommend in the section 'Aftercare and referral for medical examination' that a child/infant should be examined after a choking event. We'll ensure it is repeated more explicitly in future courses. Thanks a lot for your feedback.

  • Hi Nicola - the problem has now been corrected. Thank you for letting us know.

  • Hi Christine - the problem has now been corrected. Apologies.

  • Congratulations to you all - it was a very knowledgeable group this run and it was a pleasure to watch the various discussions in the comments. On behalf of the IFRC team, thank you to everyone that contributed. We hope that you will continue your first aid education. See you on the next course.

  • Thank you for your feedback Seema. The survey has now been corrected.

  • Hi Joanne - thanks for letting us know. It is now corrected.

  • Hi all, thank you for bringing this to our attention. I understand that it has now been corrected.

  • I fully agree Jawan - first aid should be recognised as a fundamental skill and made available to all.

  • Hi Barry and Nicola - do remember, we're only talking about a minor burn here on this introductory course. If the symptoms show that it is more than a minor burn (i.e. skin is blistering, peeling, and/or white or charred) then the response is different. This is beyond this course - I'd encourage you to pursue further courses to learn more on this situation.

  • Well done Helen

  • Hi Nicola - thanks for the question. Yes, that's a difficult situation. Coughing and seeking help will always be the first actions to take. Some first aid courses teach how to self-administer an abdominal thrust for example - of course this is far beyond this introductory online course however. If you're interested in learning more advanced techniques for...

  • Hi Tina, Nicola and Christine - apologies that it is not clear. The cross is a guiding line to help you identify a reference point for your fingers. As the image shows, your fingers should be right below where the white dotted lines meet to make a cross. This position just below the cross is the recommended finger position.

  • Welcome to the course everyone - I look forward to the discussions over these next few weeks.

  • Thanks Annette - good feedback that we'll incorporate into future courses.

  • Hi Anik, I've replied to Asmeena above, but I'll repeat my answer here - it is impossible for us to say exactly how hard. The thrust should be forceful, but should be adapted to the size of the person who is choking. This is a technique that we present here to give you some knowledge if you do find yourself in an emergency situation, but we encourage you to go...

  • Hi - it is impossible for us to say exactly how hard. The thrust should be forceful, but should be adapted to the size of the person who is choking. This is a technique that we present here to give you some knowledge if you do find yourself in an emergency situation, but we encourage you to go to a practical, in-person training with your National Red Cross or...

  • Hi Camilla - this is a common question. In this case, when the child or infant becomes unresponsive, their throat muscles could relax and open the airway enough for you to give rescue breaths or at least allow you to remove the object (although one should be very careful - only do so if you are sure of removing the object and always avoid doing a blind 'finger...

  • Hi Lynne, thanks for the question. Starting with rescue breaths is preferable. The reason being that the most common type of cardiac arrest observed in children is called asphyxial cardiac arrest, which is when someone is not getting enough oxygen into their lungs.

  • Hi Anik - as Andrea correctly says. It will depend on your assessment. If it is unsafe, or the injury is so severe that breaths are not possible, then chest compressions alone must be given.

  • Hi Maiko - many AEDs now have special adapters for children. But it is important to follow the instructions in the AED which will explain if it is appropriate to use that specific AED on the child. No, chest compressions are the not the same on babies - we will see the difference in the next step.

  • Thanks for the question Rachel - it really depends. If someone is wearing simple loose-fitting clothing which aren't impeding you being able to deliver CPR, it's perhaps not so important to remove them. However, if a woman is wearing a bra for example with metal or another material that could restrict the effectiveness of the compressions, it is important that...

  • Hi Maiko. It's natural - many people are nervous about this aspect of providing CPR, but the tips above can help. Also, I wouldn't say it doesn't matter if you break a bone, but it is vital that if you find a child in this position who is not responding and also not breathing, it is important that you do your best to overcome that fear and provide CPR - it...

  • Yes, exactly. CPR for unresponsive and not breathing. Recovery position for unresponsive but still breathing.

  • Hi Puspa, thank you for the question. Please review the image above which shows the correct position. You can also pause and review the video at the top of the page.

  • On behalf of the IFRC team, welcome to the course everyone. It is excellent to see so many people have signed up to learn first aid. Enjoy the first week.

  • Welcome to the course everyone - I hope you're enjoying the content so far. See you in the comments.

  • Good additions Keith - thanks for sharing

  • Good point David, ensuring that you have alternative modes of communication is important. Having a non-mains powered radio is also useful as important public messages may be shared by radio if TV is down or there are internet disruptions, for example.

  • Hi everyone, welcome to the course. Enjoy week 1!

  • Hi Ana - I'd encourage you to contact FutureLearn. Unfortunately, the teaching team here at the IFRC can't help with this kind of issue. Well done for completing the course.

  • @AnnMacdonald Hi Ann, do not remove a crash victim's helmet - leave that to the professionals to assess if the person has serious neck or spine injuries.

  • Congratulations everyone - the discussions on this run have been excellent. Thank you all for your engagement, and on behalf of the whole team at the IFRC, we wish you all the very best as (hopefully) you continue your first aid education into the future.

  • Thanks for the feedback all - we'll look into how we can provide perhaps printable flash cards, or something similar for future courses.

  • Hi all - this is a very difficult question and one which doesn't have a definite answer. Providing CPR to save the person's life remains as the most important action if your assessment shows that they do indeed require CPR. However, as many of you have pointed out, the situation could be more complicated, especially if bystanders do not understand the actions...

  • Thanks Linda and I certainly didn't mind your contributions - I can see the training at the British RC was in good hands. And I agree with you, National Society first aid teams and trainers are undoubtedly VIPs. In my opinion, they remain at the very heart of our Red Cross Red Crescent Movement.

  • Hi all - thanks for bringing this to our attention. As you indicated Jim, we do not have any control over this element of the Code of Conduct. We'll look into this with our colleagues at FutureLearn to ensure this is done better from our side in the future.

  • Cool water should be used for minor burns. Do not use toothpaste, oils, butter or other foodstuffs. Other products could cause infection and are less effective (or in fact completely ineffective) at cooling the damaged area.

  • Hi Diane, this is certainly true for more severe burns that may require medical attention (where the skin has broken, for example) - using cling film to protect the burn before a medical professional can provide care is often recommended, although discussion on this is beyond this introductory course. For burns that meet the symptoms of 'minor burn', as we...

  • The point is that very cold water can cause more harm, especially where you already have damage to the skin - just as putting any part of your body into an extremely cold environment for an extended period of time can cause harm.

  • Thanks for your comment Andrew - this is a very good example where it is acceptable to move the individual. The casualty's life was in immediate danger and you needed to take action as a last resort to remove them from that situation.

  • Leave the object in the wound Sim, but also make sure that you find material to 'pack' around the wound allowing you to apply pressure around the area and at the base of the object to help stop the bleeding.

  • Hi all, thanks for the question. Research has shown that the most effective action to stop bleeding is to apply direct pressure. Raising the limb on its own is shown to not be very effective at stopping the blood flow, and therefore, we recommend that the priority first aid action is to apply pressure. If you're then able to raise the limb, then you are free...

  • Hi Peter - as I've answered for some others.

    Research has shown that the most effective action to stop bleeding is to apply direct pressure. Raising the limb on its own is shown to not be very effective at stopping the blood flow, and therefore, we recommend that the priority first aid action is to apply pressure. If you're then able to raise the limb, then...

  • Hi Linda - just adding this answer here so you can see it too.

    Research has shown that the most effective action to stop bleeding is to apply direct pressure. Raising the limb on its own is shown to not be very effective at stopping the blood flow, and therefore, we recommend that the priority first aid action is to apply pressure. If you're then able to...

  • Hi Lizzie - thanks for your question. Research has shown that the most effective action to stop bleeding is to apply direct pressure. Raising the limb on its own is shown to not be very effective at stopping the blood flow, and therefore, we recommend that the priority first aid action is to apply pressure. If you're then able to raise the limb, then you are...

  • Thanks for you comment Andrew - you point is certainly valid. We recognise that the video does not (and of course cannot) include all hazards - we therefore try to use this a teaching point to get you to think about what is missing and is important. Well done.

  • Good addition Marby - mitigating risks is often about the everyday actions that you take that may seem unimportant because of their frequency, when in fact, they pose the greatest danger.

  • Good addition Otson

  • Correct Aude, well done.

  • @SusanO'Connor Thanks Susan - Diane's proposal could be a useful course of action. 'Packing' around the wound using a clean material could also work. For example, you could wrap a clean jumper around the base of the protruding object to keep it in place, which would also allow you stem the flow of blood. We will need to use our initiative and make use of the...

  • Thanks Helen - we've corrected it now.