Graeme Earl

Graeme Earl

I am a Professor of Digital Humanities at King's College London and an educator on the @UoSFLPortus course

https://twitter.com/GraemeEarl

http://about.me/graeme.earl

Location London

Activity

  • Hi Susan. That is a great suggestion. I'm afraid that we don't at present. However, I will ask my colleague Kris if there is any further he can add about the geophysical and other data from that area. Best wishes. Graeme

  • Hi all. Thank you so much for your corrections and suggestions. We will make them! Some authors have defined conventions for numbering the sides for example, so that would clarify things. Your input on all this is invaluable to us. Best wishes. Graeme

  • Hi Susan. Sorry this comment has taken a while - I have been away from the MOOC for a while whilst teaching on some internal courses. We should definitely look at the wording of that question and of the responses. I sometimes still forget how familiar I am with the place. This placemarker supports the answer best:...

  • Hi Esme. We know a fair amount from towns such as Ostia and those on the Bay of Naples about day to day social activities. Many of these centred on the baths and on bars, but social encounters happened in many parts of the towns, in a mixture of public and private settings. Often these interactions were strictly managed and related to hierarchy, as with the...

  • Hi Colin. Great to hear from you! Please do pass on details of the course to your colleagues in the group. I have long been fascinated by the Holy Ghost and Grace Dieu wrecks in the Hamble, since seeing details on aerial photographs and geophysics. All the best, Graeme

  • Hi Linda. Yep mapping tools and extensive survey are helping (and also citizen science projects - Sarah Parcak with whom we worked at portus is in the news today about a new initiative along those lines. The use of citizen researchers is proving invaluable in other contexts too, for example our colleague Leif Isaksen's work trying to link and understand...

  • Hi Janet (and all) I spoke to Julian from Shipwrecks today and he and I will both try to articulate further links between the courses. That way whether or not you are studying them both now you can always come back and follow the cross-references in the future. I will have a chat to Ian about doing the same with Hadrian's Wall. The next run is TBA but I'll see...

  • Hi Tim. Its a great view, isn't it? Google Earth just doesn't do it justice. I too love Ostia Antica. Our recent fieldwork has clarifies the connections between there and Portus. You get a sense of this in the brand new reconstruction drawing of the site that is the backdrop to the virtual tour. Technically you have to wait until next week for Trajanic things...

  • Hi Erika. Its great to hear about the connections people make between the various courses and I really hope you enjoy this new piece of the Roman world. Best wishes, Graeme

  • I like that Janet: Wallies, Porties, and perhaps next a Wreckie?! https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/shipwrecks I hope you enjoy Portus. All the best, Graeme

  • Hi Sally-Ann. Welcome to the Portus course. If the previous four runs are anything to go by you will find lots of like minded, interesting folks here. Best wishes, Graeme

  • Hi Anne - its great to see learners moving between the various courses. Ian Haynes drops in to this one sometimes so I will let him know you loved Hadrian's Wall! Best wishes, Graeme

  • Hi Kristin - its great to know that you are applying the learning from these courses to different contexts. What kinds of archaeology in northern Europe and Scandinavia are you particularly interested in? My colleague Jon Adams works in that part of the world in a maritime context: https://www.southampton.ac.uk/archaeology/about/staff/jjra.page and another...

  • Hi both. Yes sometimes people do spend longer than the four hours but I hope that you can keep to that time if you want to. We provide lots of potential diversions (such as the virtual tour https://tour.portusproject.org/en/ for example) but none of this is required for you to achieve the learning objectives. All the best, Graeme

  • Welcome to the Portus Project Elena! G

  • Refreshing honesty Donald :-) What have the 19th C British ever done for us, eh? I hope you enjoy a bit of Roman Italy for a change. Best wishes, Graeme

  • Hi Tracey. Great to hear it! The course mixes between roman history, archaeology and methods so I hope you enjoy the mix. All the best, Graeme

  • Hi Kathleen. Great to welcome back a Southampton alumnus, and really good to hear that you like the ways in which education has developed. This week has been busy for me: started teaching on this MOOC, started a closed MOOC for dissertation students at Southampton, supervised some third year dissertation presentations, started a masters module and tomorrow an...

  • Welcome Katharina! Graeme

  • Welcome to the project! We hope that by the end you will consider yourself a real part of the team. We are back in the field this summer we hope and so if you have any ideas for improving the clarity etc. as you go through the course let us know and we might be able to record updates, or perhaps create more opportunities to do some analysis of your own. All...

  • Hi Christine. One of the (many) things I love about being involved in this MOOC stuff is the diversity of experiences and expertise they bring together. Some of the greatest insights have come from "newbies" :-) Please do share your ideas as you progress. Best wishes, Graeme

  • Good to meet you Bernie. I hope you enjoy it! Graeme

  • Welcome Karen. Ian Haynes and I are good friends - in fact we are organising a joint workshop on digital archaeology in the summer. It is great to see people moving between the various courses. Let me know in the comments if particular parallels between the courses occur to you and we can add further cross-references. Cheers, Graeme

  • Hi S P! Well we try to provide plenty to keep you all busy :-) But equally remember that this is your course to study in your way. Some learners choose to miss elements in order to concentrate on their particular interests, some follow every link and read every additional thing, others dip in and out. We are here to help you along the way so don't worry about...

  • Hi Colin. Welcome to the cost. There are varying views in terms of the usage of those terms and we chose to go with the ones that are most commonly used on the literature relating to the site. I do appreciate the preference that people have either way and whilst "common era" does have a long history of use and is increasingly more common in publications I am...

  • Hi Francine. We have continued to try to find a solution but unfortunately it wasn't possible, for the reasons I gave previously. Let me know when your re-arranged trip is (via email) and I will see what I can arrange to make sure you have a good visit. All the best, Graeme

  • Hi Nora. Yes - we all take the digital divide seriously. It doesn't only extend to access to broadband and devices but also to the biases inherent in the learning design. For example, the ability to work within ad hoc social networks and to communicate in short form both correlate with specific demographics and educational experiences, as demonstrated by...

  • Hi Sarah. Yes I agree - there is no point embracing technology as a supposedly democratising tool if it is only accessible to those with fast broadband. I know for certain that FL appreciate this and aim for a good balance between quality of experience and bandwidth. It would be good to have a mechanism though whereby one could write and cache comments away...

  • I can only concur! We tried many forms of digital recording at Portus and in the end opted for the hybrid solution of writing notes on a chalkboard and then using computer vision (undertaken by our friends in Tartu) to find the writing in the thousands of record photographs. Technology has its significant place but it shouldn't drive what we do. All the best....

  • Not at all Sandra! I remember once receiving a criticism that I was too interested in edutainment and I replied that I couldn't think of a better compliment than being told that my education was even the slightest bit entertaining. It is perhaps a truism to suggest that we watch children being inspired by the world and then risk dampening this through...

  • Wow! I was editing my comment (typos and added my thoughts on what universities do) as yours came in! We are definitely thinking on the same lines. This may not be the place to ask but I would be really interested to know how those learners on this course with degrees feel about how Portus and other courses like it online compare to their student experiences,...

  • Hi Francine. Just to confirm we haven't forgotten you. August is a difficult time as so many colleagues are on holiday or on fieldwork elsewhere in Italy but we are doing our best to find a solution. Cheers. Graeme

  • Hi Roger. Thanks for your comment and making the cross reference to other courses. It would be *great* if you all could recommend cross references to other courses. Many (like ours) now also have steps accessible without being registered so at least you can get a gist of the content even if you haven't (yet) registered on that particular course. As Peter says...

  • Hi Sandra. Leeds is one of the first universities offering FL "programs". Some of these carry university recognised credit, others have an exam and feedback but no credit. At present I don't think that they are offering whole degrees but the BBC reported on the view of Coursera's founder that this is the direction of travel. You will not be surprised to learn...

  • Absolutely perfect Lindsey. I laughed out loud! Now for added plus points now (a) draw yourself a Harris Matrix to put off finishing the reports, (b) use the date of the urgent report to relatively date the USB stick and (c) possibly make yourself a cup of tea and put a nice biscuit on the top of the pile :-) G

  • Hi Sandra. That is great news - many thanks. We really enjoy being on the journey too. Yep lots of science and lots of arts and humanities expertise all mixed up - that is why we all find archaeology so interesting. I can;t remember where I mention it on the course but one member of the Portus team Rose Ferraby is a fabulous artist as well as being an expert...

  • Hi Sarah. To my shame I had to google "Matroosberg Mountains". It looks absolutely beautiful. I have spent many happy hours over the last few years contributing to the course from cliffs overlooking cornish beaches and various other outdoor locations. Peter is right - the flexibility of learning and teaching is a big plus. It is now possible to download our...

  • Hi Sarah. Yes it did get a bit technical! Are there things we could provide to make it easier to follow in the future? Enjoy the school holidays...! Graeme

  • That's great Kristy! Did you discuss coring in your group as well as on the coring steps? I can't find specific conversations easily in groups as there are so many! I will be able to look tomorrow once I get an updated data set from the course but I would be interested to know whether you felt your Study Group is helping with discussions on all topics, rather...

  • Hi Kristy. Thank you! I've just looked through your comments - lots of really interesting comments and points. If you add some comments explaining which bits were least easy to understand we will do our best to make things clearer. Thanks and best wishes, Graeme

  • Here is an extra link to some blog posts relating to week three that bring together some discussions from previous runs of the course: http://moocs.southampton.ac.uk/portus/category/week-three/ Cheers, Graeme

  • Well done Sue! I hope you find week four equally interesting. I think the main technical bits are done now, although we use some particular terms when excavating that you will need to get your head round. If there are points that need to be clarified and perhaps added to the Glossary then let us know. All the best, Graeme