pamela rogerson revell

pamela rogerson revell

I'm a Professor in Applied Linguistics and TESOL at the University of Leicester. I research and teach in several areas of applied linguistics and TESOL including online language learning.

Activity

  • Hi everyone . Just a reminder that the live webinar is tomorrow, Wednesday 21st February at 13.00 UK time. We look forward to meeting those of you who can make it to the webinar. I know it's not easy with different time zones but if you can't, the webinar will be recorded and uploaded to the MOOC anyway.

    Don't forget, if you have any questions for the...

  • Many thanks to all of you who have completed this course. We've very much enjoyed reading your interesting and insightful comments. I hope like me you will feel that you have learned a lot from each other and have shared our fascination with language, how it works and how we use it.

    We wish you all the best with your future studies, observations and interests.

  • Some of you might be interested in a rather radical view put forward by a leading applied linguist, Robert Phillipson, some years ago. His article was entitled "Lingua franca or lingua frankensteinia? English in European integration and globalisation" http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.470.8305&rep=rep1&type=pdf

  • I'm glad to hear you've enjoyed the course Tracey and found some points you can implement in your teaching.

  • Thanks for letting us know Tony. I hope you've enjoyed the course anyway.

  • I hope you have enjoyed the topics covered this week. There are obviously many areas that we could go into in more depth but here are a few suggestions for further reading/viewing if you are interested.

    Accent

    Cauldwell, R. (2013). Lord Rant: a personal journey through prejudice, accent and identity. Speak Out, 48, 4-7. IATEFL...

  • There are many ways that individuals try to be supportive in situations like this. A lot of people say they would slow down and there's research evidence to show that typically people speak more quickly in their first language than in other languages. There is however the danger that we adopt what has been referred to as 'foreigner talk' (Ferguson,...

  • Donald Trump tends to evoke strong reactions as a politician, and person. What role do you think his language and voice have on the impression he creates?

  • People tend to have a wide range of interesting, and differing, views on this. It's important to remember that Jenkins (2000) wasn't suggesting a set of 'rules' for teaching pronunciation but a list of priorities to ensure intelligibility between L2 speakers of English. Her findings were based on analysing communication between non-native speakers and seeing...

  • As you can imagine, this is a tricky area. Again, we can see how closely pronunciation and perceptions of accent are so closely related to our emotional reactions to people, even if we don't like that.

    I think most people agree that mutual intelligibility is the common goal but is the answer to have one common , standard accent? Having RP as a UK standard...

  • This is where the 5 speakers in the audio recordings are from:

    1 Liverpool (Scouse)

    2. Yorkshire

    3. RP

    4 London/Estuary English

    5 Scottish

    And this is what our survey showed:

    Most educated – speaker 3

    Most attractive – speaker 3

    Most trustworthy – speaker 2

    Most competent – speaker 3

    Broader surveys have shown that RP, a...

  • Some of you may be aware that the RP accent is, like any accent, changing over time. There is considerable debate about the future of RP -will it die out completely? - or merge with other accents, such as Estuary English? Also, some phoneticians are uncomfortable with the term itself and have suggested alternatives, such as BBC English, General British English...

  • It would be interesting to know if you have any preferences for the sound of different languages, and if you have a 'telephone voice'?

  • Welcome to unit 4 of our course. This week we'll be looking at the role of pronunciation, quite broadly, not only in teaching but also socially and the impact our voice and accent can have on our everyday lives. I look forward to your comments on these topics.

  • Thank you all for your very interesting comments this week. I've really enjoyed reading your responses and views and I'm sure we'll all learn a lot in the coming weeks as we continue to share our experiences and expertise.

  • I see that some of you have made a distinction between forms that we see as 'acceptable/unacceptable' or 'correct'incorrect'. The 'acceptable/unacceptable' view typically reflects a 'descriptive' approach to grammar, based largely on people's usage of language, while the 'correct/incorrect' view aligns more closely with a 'prescriptive' approach which sees...

  • Thanks for your interesting comments. Many of you seem to agree that NSs have an advantage and you make some useful suggestions for strategies to deal with NNS disadvantage. Some companies and corporations are becoming more aware of this and taking communication skills training more seriously, for both NS and NNS

  • Some interesting responses here. Thank you. Generally, most of you seem to consider that there are some differences in language use based on gender, culture or other variables and that these differences tend to come from nurture (i.e.be learned behaviours) rather than nature. We'll explore these points further in the next step.

  • Several of you highlight the difference between what is considered 'grammatically correct' and 'acceptable' language. This point illustrates the difference between 'descriptive' and 'prescriptive' views of grammar and also the fact that most grammars have been based on written rather than spoken language usage. As we can see, language use evolves and often...

  • Hello everyone who has just joined and welcome to our course on Applied Linguistics and TESOL. I hope you will find it enjoyable and informative and we look forward to working with you. Each of these 6 weekly units has been written and is moderated by myself and colleagues here in the Applied Linguistics team at the University of Leicester. Each week, the...

  • Welcome Jolie and Puspita (I hope I've addressed you correctly?) I hope you will enjoy the course and find it useful to you both for your maters studies.

  • Sorry about that Jonathan. I can't access it either! I'll try and find out what's going on.

  • What about current developments in AI Jonathan? Do you think that will change things?

  • Thanks Jonathan for posting such interesting comments to the discussions and activities this week. There are obviously many areas that we could go into in more depth but here are a few suggestions for further reading/viewing if you are interested.

    Accent

    Cauldwell, R. (2013). Lord Rant: a personal journey through prejudice, accent and identity. Speak...

  • Your comments show many ways that you would be supportive in situations like this. Research suggests that a lot of people unconsciously modify their language by slowing down and simplifying their speech. While this can obviously be a good thing, there is however the danger that we adopt what has been referred to as 'foreigner talk' (Ferguson,...

  • That was certainly the goal of her voice coaching. Although, some found the change more negative than positive, giving the impression that she was domineering and patronising.

  • As you say, it's impossible to stop the evolution of language (although people keep trying, e.g. the Academie Francaise in France. However, the complication is that pronunciation in particular is so socially 'loaded', so it's not only a case of what is more communicatively effective.

  • You're quite right Jonathan that there is a lot of accent discrimination against non-prestige first language accents, as in the example you describe. It's good to know that the situation has improved to some extent which greater acceptance of indigenous languages or accents.

  • Hi Jonathan, you rightly point out that your accent is highly influenced by by your social and geographical context and by your role models. You say that you haven't changed your accent but it seems that you are able to 'shift' your accent to accommodate who you are talking to. There more on style shifting later in this unit.

  • Some thought-provoking comments here. You show the need for 'awareness' and 'sensitivity' in communication contexts where English is being used as a lingua franca. There is also the issue that while it might be good for native speakers to 'dial down', is there a risk that this is construed as 'talking down' to the non-native speaker?

    If you have time, you...

  • Many interesting comments here. A lot of you have suggested that there can be gender differences in the use of language but that nurture plays a greater role than nature. You also rightly point out that many factors, social, psychological and cultural can influence such differences.

  • Hi Erica I'm pleased to hear you're developing a language course for refugees. I thought you might be interested in reading a British Council research report that I and my colleagues have just completed on the value of language learning for refugees' well being:...

  • Some really interesting views here. I like the point that gender differences might be one of many factors, including age, social and professional affiliation etc.

  • It's good to see that some of you already have an understanding of what linguistics is.
    The point is that there seems to be a slight mismatch between the everyday use of the term 'linguist' and the subject specific term.

  • Hello everyone. This is just to let you know that I, and my academic colleagues, will be moderating this course for the next 6 weeks. I hope very much that you are enjoying learning about Applied Linguistics and TESOL and we very much look forward to sharing ideas and views with you.

  • Welcome everyone who has joined the course so far. It's good to see so much enthusiasm for applied linguistics and TESOL. I, and my colleagues, are looking forward to working with you over the coming weeks

  • I'm glad to hear you're studying for our PhD Ernesto and wish you all the best with your studies. Many thanks for your positive comments about this course. I hope it's been of value to you.

  • There seems to be quite a lot of agreement amongst us about the last 3 statements above but less about the first two (i.e. the goal of 'nativeness' and prioritising segmentals or suprasegmentals. As I say in the feedback to this exercise, this reflects the fact that there is a lot of debate surrounding these issues.

  • Your comments show many ways that you would be supportive in situations like this. A lot of you say you would slow down and there's research evidence to show that typically people speak more quickly in their first language than in other languages. There is however the danger that we adopt what has been referred to as 'foreigner talk' (Ferguson,...

  • Well-observed Ernesto. Do you think the voice changes are effective?

  • Lots of interesting, and differing, views here. It's important to remember that Jenkins (2000) wasn't suggesting a set of 'rules' for teaching pronunciation but a list of priorities to ensure intelligibility between L2 speakers of English. Her findings were based on analysing communication between non-native speakers and seeing when and why pronunciation...

  • Many of you agree that people shouldn't need to reduce or neutralise their accent unless it interferes with intelligibility. This seems a very sensible approach - the difficulty is knowing how to separate those features of pronunciation which affect clarity of speech more than others.