Steve Bamlett

Steve Bamlett

I am retired and really only register for these things to keep my brain active. Everyone says that is a lost cause. I get passionate about ideas though still.

Location County Durham

Achievements

Activity

  • Available online through Google search:
    http://classics.mit.edu/Hippocrates/airwatpl.mb.txt

    Local knowledge is vital because it details aspects of environment vital to health - quality of air, water, dietary resources, although these need to compared to variations between people in terms of their balance of humours in the constitution of their physical...

  • The situation with regard to 'norms' is still not so different although these tend to researched statistical norms, hence the magical importance of reading numbers in modern medicine.

  • Frank Tallis made a career of seeing love as set of symptoms of mental ill-health:
    https://www.franktallis.com/

  • Magical thinking in young children is treated by Piaget as an early form of the application of wish fulfilment and I'm sure that survived paganism globally. The power of desire can be reified or it can be part of a narrative of transformation. There is enough in the Bible to foster beliefs in some sects or to encourage them as allegories of truths. I think.

  • "Medical texts appear to be written for other doctors, ..."
    That may be so but people get information about their health (what's 'good' or 'bad' for it) from many various sources regardless of authority or evidence even up to today. Often it is replete with metaphor like 'imbalance' - like the ones used to justify anti-depressants. in that sense not unlike...

  • Excellent resource finding education to encourage research. Thanks

  • So agree with the need to abandon reference to 'complete' health. it becomes a means of oppression against the chronically sick and otherwise abled in society otherwise, who need positive images too. And anyway, maybe admissions of vulnerability should be at the core of a genuine healthy attitude that does not masquerade under statistics or mere appearances...

  • Zenophon's Socrates is really Zenophon then while Pato's is really plato. Maybe. Never thought of that. Thanks.

  • In fact think of the benefits system now under the present Government if you want a cold calculating look at how ill health disadvantages UNLESS a functional disablement, and not even always then.

  • Loved the dialogue. Socrates (via Plato) still surprises and floors me. But the factor that is important in that dialogue is not health as such but the outcome of a declared health status. This is very culture specific. Think of the legendary fate of sick children in Sparta in the continually recycled myths about Sparta - denied by...

  • I have a miniature copy bust of Hygeia over the fire mantel that came from the museum at Athens. i think the best comparison in words is thinking about the Goddess in relation to cult and practice (at Epidaurors for instance - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hygieia) and the derivation through a path to the modern 'hygiene' which is about cleanliness but even if...

  • I think we can oversimplify the view of the ancients about mental and physical health because the terminology for talking about either or both was different and usually had a physical element registering the sensation of good and bad health. Even the location of health less likely to be the heart but other organs as well or instead. The dimension of the...

  • My experience exactly fits with Idalie's analysis. I couldn't be bothered to read pulse the BHF way, relying entirely on my mechanical 'shagnmometer' 9if the mechanical ones are still called that.

  • Had no luck with BHF teaching advice. from my attempts I could well be dead! Lol

  • Having looked at other responses, i've found my response to Covid pandemic might have been different but that's mainly because I'm over retirement age and have fully retired. i have always worked in fairly sedentary work - although teaching my way involved a lot of flinging me arms about - and i'd put on lots of weight and I'm diabetic. hence high risk for...

  • My name is Steve. I am retired and going to the gym regularly for the first time in my life at 66. My work was in teaching literature, social work and then teaching social work & psychology, including health Psychology.

  • Health today is an issue of maintenance of body, mind and other functions (religious for some but not me) at peak functioning based on best advice on diet, exercise, occupation and reflection. For the Greeks it may have been related to function, particularly military function for men, although philosophers like Plato and Aristotle give it a mental and/or...

  • That in teaching a subject you can attempt to do too much.

  • i think her reign was the most consistent attempt of any monarch to fashion a rational and identity of monarch for a new age across the realm of administration, ideological control and maintenance of power without war and by centralising these issues. I see her as transforming the imperial idea so that it became ripe for its later use in terms of global empire.

  • I think I will choose Elizabeth and the goddesses:
    The portrait of Paris is a fine rebuke to the insubstantiality of some forms of male power and the decision-making it involves. it is a bullish portrait, defending the choice of single state very well but also allowing Mary to excel in all the realms commanded by the 3 goddesses, as well as be associate with...

  • Does putting mysticism and the occult at the centre of Elizabeth’s court change your perception of her reign?

    I think the ways in which 'magic' was spoken about in the period covered many various purposes and can't really be dragooned into helping form an opinion. There were secular magics for instance like art which Prospero to some respect represents in...

  • "stupid and inarticulate (think of Bottom ..."

    Never! Lol.

  • Again the choice between binaries is unhelpful in trying to get to grips with the issues politically, ideologically or in terms of working within a prescribed sexual politics.

  • I don't think a binary choice like this really covers all the factors nor does it build a strong basis for understanding the idea of courtly love, its origins and links to Plato and Neo-Platonism (al;l essential for understanding the poetry of the period).

  • I think the poor awareness of Mary has a lot to do with a studied ignorance, and the marginalisation of, Scottish history in English schools. there was a better basis for independence than this fact.

  • When I did my degree in literature I was really excited to find that poem Richard - then in a little anthology with the off-putting title of 'Silver poets of the sixteenth century'.

  • The quotation seems a much more elaborate version of Spenser's notion of a 'dark conceite' wherein religious mystery and puzzlement (labyrinths) are called in to explain irreconcilable issues through myth, especially myths of androgyny. I do not think these solve the political issues except ideologically so when Elizabeth lost power, those ideological...

  • Crucial to the iconography. This is a response to some of the issues bedevilling women who seek power in patriarchal culture but she used the imagery against men. The problem is her models were immortal, she was not and the practical issue of succession was more complex for a woman, even if only because of the absoluteness of the proof of hereditary...

  • Ralegh, for instance, was an accomplished poet; he wrote a book, The Historie of the World, to occupy his time when he was imprisoned by King James I; he also served as a Member of Parliament.

    Yes, but much of this is about being the courtier including being learned about the Platonic model of what love of a monarch might mean, as in the wonderful 'Ocean's...

  • I think Elizabeth used the iconography of women in the Bible to bolster an image of secular renewal but this led her to find images of powerful chastity that were end-stopped because the models were immortal and enduring and she, and monarchs generally, were not.

  • I think the binary of Protestant and Catholic terribly unhelpful anyway especially since much of the thinking returned to the history of the early Church in the Roman Empire, the break between East and West and the notion of a Christian Empire. If the issue is about liturgy then I think the aim was to conserve and look backwards but to insist on national...

  • Yes I do @TessyR I think the key skill is learning to use evidence in debate of differing opinions rather than treating evidence as close-ended facts. I think the relationship between fact and interpretation would be opened up by the 'afterlives' theme but it doesn't happen. there are history fact articles then rather disjointed pieces on film and theatre etc...

  • The introduction to a 'princely' courtly education is really important, although I would be more interested in whether that learning spread to Renaissance interpretations of the classics as, from the literature, you would guess it would. Her grasp of how power is manipulated in fact and in fiction is my interest in her, particularly the ways in which she and...

  • Disappointed by the coverage of Mary 1 on the course but enjoyed the rest. There was too much asking us to opinionate and not enough substantial debate to engage with. Not so with the others.

  • With you on this Tessy R.

  • Should film-makers should be open and honest about how they have “stretched” the truth?

    What a loaded question. The same could be said of any debate about historical interpretation. David Starkey never worried about interpreting the break from Rome as a kind of Brexit to legitimise his view of English recidivism and rejoice in it. I see no 'dishonesty' in...

  • That issues of succession were a moveable feast when it came to principles which tend to be evoked after and not before the event to justify the plan carrying most political weight.

  • A lot but not necessarily in the historical scenes apparently represented but rather in the processes involved in creating a selective vision of the past for the purposes of the present. It is DeLARoche's motivation that interest or those he intuited in his audiences.

  • Yes. By precedent and Tudor practice at least where legitimacy becomes somewhat divorced from heredity and primogeniture.

  • Yes, I agree Tessy R