Aaron Casey

Aaron Casey

Head of Music Business at BIMM Dublin and independent music rights and royalties consultant. Interested in music business. Focused on music rights and royalties.

Location Dublin, Ireland

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  • Aaron Casey made a comment

    Based in Dublin, Ireland. I teach music business subject in higher education. Students range from roughly 18-22 with mature students also. I mainly teach in a group environment but also conduct tutorials and workshops.

  • A very interesting course (both the topics and the learners)! Thank you again Marisa.

  • They were set up by the major/major indie music publishers in order to license digital rights across multiple European territories. They’re complex licences but are still only one licence which reduces admin. One example would be IMPEL (which MPA/MCPS has spun out of their business into an independent entity) which aligned itself with SACEM to negotiate...

  • 1. They identify ownership (are you employed to create? / do you own the copyright?) and remuneration for work rendered.

    2. The creator holds the exclusive copyright controls (if not in a publishing agreement (book or music)

    3. Census/sampling/analogy through public performance / mechanical reproduction. On the basis of a written agreement between...

  • It's an exciting time for CMOs. Special Purpose Vehicles (SPVs) are on the rise and there has never been so much choice with regards to selecting a CMO that suits you.

  • 1. All revolve around rights, the assignment and licensing of which make the creative industries generate income for rightsholders.

    2. The varying stakeholders and shareholders

  • When you say that the publisher keeps 50% of the revenue, it's not necessarily the case. When you sign a publishing deal it's normally that the publisher registers the songs with the CMO (say UBC), and will collect 50% of this income. They are then required by the publishing agreement to distribute a certain percentage of all income with their writers i.e. 50%...

  • If this occurred in Ireland or the UK the person who is taking the video would own the video and would own the master of the recording. The question then is, can they monetise this? The answer is yes, if they can find someone who would like to buy this. If they have recorded it on their own phone/camera then they own the equipment. That's great but when they...

  • Nice to see you here Vick!

  • Pleased to be back Marisa!

  • A great start to the course, thank you Marisa!

  • Copyright exists as an acknowledgement to creators and rightsholders. It grants them ownership or part-ownership of their creative endeavours and the rights of property that come with that. These exclusive copyright controls allow creators to earn a living from their expression. The creative and cultural industries are built on this foundation of mutual...

  • I believe that Aaron Gonzalves has hit the nail on the head below. While there are a number of 'sectors' in the creative and cultural industries (CCIs) the goods/artefacts/creative output can be the culmination of work from several rightsholders. Taking Aaron Gonzalves example of a music video you would have a Composer, Lyricist, Artist, Choreographer,...

  • Hello everyone, my name is Aaron Casey and I'm based in Dublin, Ireland. I'm the Head of Music Business at BIMM Dublin where I teach music publishing and music business. I'm also a music rights and royalties consultant. As well as partaking in this course I am also currently studying a Postgraduate Certificate in Learning and Teaching from the University of...

  • If you have a specific subject you would like to learn more about in creative industries, let us know.

    It would be interesting to discuss music publishing, music synchronisation, the various types of rights associated with a musical work, the licensing, collection and distribution of royalties of musical works from a global perspective, distribution...

  • When writing the assignment based upon the previously set guidelines, was it easy to explain your ideas?

    I think the course provided me the basis with which to construct my argument. A lot of course members also raised some very valid points throughout the last four weeks which added weight to multiple arguments.

    Did the questions you were asked to...

  • There are many of them. ICE, SOLAR, POLARIS, MINT, ARESA, AMRA to name a few.

  • Aaron Casey made a comment

    1. What would be a fair split of the economic result between all the parties involved?

    You've got composers, authors and arrangers of out of copyright works, you've got artists and record labels, you've got producers and you've got performers. Performing rights, master rights and performer rights. Each are standalone. Neither can function without the other....

  • 1. What services did you first use?

    I first would have consumed music through YouTube and then through YouTube embeds within Bebo. The proliferation of YouTube through social media networks grew the service usage exponentially.

    2. What were they offering?

    A free service showcasing licensed creative content and UGC (user generated content) at the click...

  • By joining together and pooling resources towards developing methods of collecting performance information. These methods would have to be standardised so that the information could be interpreted between societies. There would always be language barriers but by formatting universal approaches to the licensing, collection and distribution of royalties it would...

  • The protections that were in effect up to and during wartime were underlying foundations to copyright and fair use. War did not constitute a cessation of creative endeavours. People kept diaries, wrote songs, painted. The expression and tone of creative works were undoubtedly affected by the global climate at the time but these people still needed to be...

  • Aaron Casey made a comment
  • Aaron Casey made a comment

    There's strength in numbers. Creators were able to band together and 'unionise' for better want of a word. This allowed them to collectively manage their own repertoire but also champion the right of other composers whose music was performed in their territories on the basis that their rights would be reciprocally championed abroad also through a network of...

  • While there are still new collection societies being created in territories where copyright law has yet to catch up to the wider world we are seeing a proliferation of Special Purpose Vehicles (SPVs) being created to properly license the use of music and track the remuneration of creators in the digital sphere.

  • Being based in Ireland, sometimes songwriters will approach me and ask for information regarding registering their copyright worldwide and ask if I can help them register through the US Copyright Office. We do not have anything to do with the registration of copyright but we do get asked it a lot. Copyright exists at the moment of creation of the artistic work...

  • 1. What was necessary to guarantee that the expansion of the market would become profitable for creators?

    That the protections that were available to them in one territory would be available in any territory. Also, that the 'market' would be supervised and regulated with all legal or technology driven changes being made with the creator in mind alongside...

  • Yes, I believe that composers, authors and arrangers of out-of-copyright material should be compensated for the use of their works but the work involved lies around the licensing, collection and distribution of these licence fees in the form of a royalty. It's a complex system and requires regular reviews of its processes to keep in line with technology.