Emilie Martinoni Hoogenboom

Emilie Martinoni Hoogenboom

Emilie is a consultant in anaesthesia at UCLH, and an honorary senior clinical teaching fellow at UCL, with a special interest in airway management, teaching and education.

Location London

Activity

  • Hi Sumita - great to have you on the course - Please do let your colleagues know about this course :)

  • Thank you for your question.
    Once the airway is secured - the priority is to stabilise the patient and care for them in the most appropriate location, probably the ITU. Further management will depend on the time of the day and the available resources on site. They may need transferring to a specialist hospital or wait until the availability of the...

  • Welcome to Week 4!

    It is one of my favourite weeks as we get to meet one of our patients, Jen, who tells us about her experience of tracheostomy.

    As you are now half-way through the course, we would like to invite you to fill in our mid-course evaluation questionnaire:

    https://forms.gle/jqFmqKZ1d13K6sWY6

  • Lots more learning to come!
    Enjoy Week 2!

  • Hopefully this will be available soon!

  • Thank you for all your contributions.

    One of the teaching from Elaine's tragic case is to, in a team, "flatten the hierarchy" so that everyone feels empowered to speak up. This can be achieved by simple things, like introductions with names and roles at the brief.

    It may also be useful to use specific communication tools (graded assertiveness) to...

  • Thank you for your contribution to the discussion. One of the learning points from Elaine's tragic case is to "flatten the hierarchy" so that everyone feels empowered to speak up. That can be achieved by simple things, like introductions with names and roles at the brief or by learning specific communication tools on how to escalate concerns. E.g PACE...

  • Thank you Kelly - I hope that the course is helping with this.

  • I am always amazed by all the suggestions that are brought up in this discussion. Several of you recognise the importance of "getting the basics right", such as assessment, preparing the equipment, etc. Having these measures in place allows for greater ability to perform well during a crisis.

  • Thank you for joining the course @NicolaTHOMAS ! You raise a very important point, particularly in a crisis is very important to have clear roles and responsibilities. I hope this course will help you in identifying any areas of improvement.

  • I very much agree with having a pragmatic approach!

  • Welcome to our new learners!

    I am looking forward to discussing "Airway Matters" with you and the team of facilitators is going to be monitoring discussions and contributions for the next six weeks!

    Airway Matters was first launched three years ago, we are now conducting an evaluation to study its impact.

    Before you start the course, we would like...

  • Not at all late!

  • Welcome to our new learners!

    I am looking forward to discussing "Airway Matters" with you and the team of facilitators is going to be monitoring discussions and contributions for the next six weeks!

    Airway Matters was first launched three years ago, we are now conducting an evaluation to study its impact.

    Before you start the course, we would like...

  • Well done for getting to the end of Week 1! I have really enjoyed reading your comments and insights! Keep up the great work!

  • You have highligthed some very important points @MarieBerlouis
    Self awareness is also developed with training and practice, often, whilst we train the window of "I don't know what I don't know" is quite large.

  • Preventing unrecognised oesophageal intubation: a consensus guideline from the Project for Universal Management of Airways and international airway societies have recently been published . Do take a look and check your practice in your workplace. Can you find anything that needs to be improved?

  • Thank you for letting us know

  • Welcome to our new joiners! Over the next 6 weeks, starting on the 31st of October, the team of facilitators will be present to interact with you and answer any queries. Please feel free to tag us directly - in the next page you will see the names of the educators for this Run! Enjoy the course

  • That is a very good question @SeynabAli - one of the teaching from this tragic case is to "flatten the hierarchy" so that everyone feels empowered to speak up. That can be achieved by simple things, like introductions with names and roles at the brief or by learning specific communication tools on how to escalate concerns. E.g
    PACE approach

    Probe – “do...

  • Hi Jon, this is an example from a theatre setting, where the items you mention are available separately.

  • Thank you for sharing your experience James.

  • Great tool to help with cognitive load!

  • Sorry to hear that Julie. It is working for me, but I paste the link here. Please try and let me know. https://padlet.com/AirwayMatters/tal8jte2j07k

  • Thank you for your feedback. The video was filmed taking into consideration the COVID-19 guidance at the time. Can you see if you can activate the caption/subtitles in the bottom right quadrant of the video? That should make it easier.

  • I think introductions by name is such an important step when working in a team - remember that was mentioned in the human factors experts top tips in Week 1!

  • I like it too Jordan and find that in the hospital environment where I work it's not used as often as it could be.

  • Hi @AlisonBlake-Reed can you see if it is possible for you to switch on the English caption/subtitles in the video? It should be in the bottom left corner

  • Well done for getting to Week 6! I have enjoyed reading your experience of pre-hospital medicine in the previous weeks and have been very impressed by your engagement.

  • Well done on completing Week 3! It is very rewarding to read how you are applying the knowledge from the course to your practice! Keep the examples coming.

  • Thank you for sharing your experience, sounds like a very stressful situation was handled promptly and swiftly by the team.

  • Thank you for sharing! I think your intervention to call for extra help was absolutely correct! Well done!

  • Thank you for sharing this resource

  • Yes, I would agree with you Stephanie. The daily team brief is an excellent opportunity to discuss proceeding in a MDT setting and to bring everyone on the same page "sharing the same mental model".

  • Multidisciplinary education makes a lot of sense: training together when working together, sharing a similar “mental model”. Have you been back on LW afte the teaching and noticed any changes?

  • Hi @KyranThomas auscultation is very useful and is good practice, you may be able to pick up problems like end-bronchial intubation or bronchospasm. Capnography tells you that the ETT is in the airway or that the airway is open if the patient is breathing spontaneously or has a supraglottic airway in situ.

  • Congratulations to achieving the end of Week 2! I am so impressed with your engagement and all your comments showing lots of insight. I am learning a lot from all your experiences. Thank you! Please stay with us for the rest of the course, lots of very exciting content to come :)

  • @KarenW I think 14G cannulae have a high risk of kinking, and then still need to provide oxygenation and also a way for insufflated gas to escape. ETT are widely available and are pieces of equipment we are all familiar with. The stress is also on training. Whichever technique is adopted, the skill needs to be rehearsed again and again so that it happens...

  • I think the vortex is a nice complement to the DAS guidelines. What I like in particular is the "Stay in the green zone" concept, highlighting the importance of oxygenation, rather than intubation at all costs. If oxygenation is not provided by any of the three methods (FMV, tube, SGA), then we start to fall into the vortex, with a final commitment to...

  • Thank you @CherylBurton , it's so helpful especially in emergency situation to have things clearly labelled and visible

  • Hi Mark, I really like the concept of "surgically inevitable airway" - eFONA is a very stressful situation for all involved and addressing the concept of "failure" can help.

  • Hi Peter, thank you for sharing this harrowing story. What do you think were the factors that made the procedure work well?