Rudy Shankar

Rudy Shankar

I have enjoyed successful business career in energy and wish to pass on to the younger generation the challenges, the innovative potential and the importance of electricity to health and prosperity.

Location United States

Achievements

Activity

  • C- Customer, Supermarket Purchasing Manager, Prod Manager , Sales & Dev Mgr, Finance & Purchasing Mgr
    D- HR and Franchise Manager & Competitor
    B- Aunt Carla

  • Having transitioned from the business world (40+ years) to academia-- training them for leadership in energy under a Masters program in 10 months- I am learning about fluid organizational responsibilities, deadlines as aspirations and, yes, viewing my students as customers. Also learned that the revenue business model is byzantine. So:

    Key Stakeholders-...

  • Today's market provides a 360-degree view on everybody. You as a product manager will be judged by your customers, competition, associates and peers. Your bosses, stakeholders, well wishers have yet another view. It doesn't take much for reputations to be enhanced (or ruined) by any one of them articulating via the internet

  • How fitting! Sir David who devoted and continues his work on nature, its impact, in beautiful pictures, words. And Barack Obama who was the first truly world citizen for whom the leadership mantle was very appropriate. Climate change is not what will destroy civilization but would cause untold misery and havoc. CC strategies are more to minimize than to avoid...

  • I am still in awe of the amount of material presented and the effort put into it by GEM. To have such a wealth of knowledge shared for free! Just one word of caution: while it is free there may be some unintended false impressions of energy. It remains the best time to be in energy for innovation but also it is now even more difficult to manage with all the...

  • Good points! Especially since GEM is/must be very conversant of EdF's long and impressive track record with nuclear. Another point is that the European customers seem more willing than Americans to pay a premium for renewable energy.

  • "What motivates a computer?" Interesting question...

  • Rudy Shankar made a comment

    Hi, everybody. I have had a long career in the energy field and I find the most exciting things are happening with Big Data, especially in equipment health diagnostics and prognostics. Imagine if you can accurately forecast the output of a solar farm as cloud cover approaches. Imagine if you are able to smooth out the intermittencies due to varying wind...

  • 1. From the scope, timeline and $ develop a prototype plan. Be prepared to change the plan quite often
    2. Have a "good handle" on the risks, internal and external in task completion. In the energy industry have you ever wondered why nuclear plant construction is one which ALWAYS has cost over-runs? It is because risk is a moving target, and the risk register...

  • Rudy Shankar made a comment

    Very well organized and packaged course and packed a lot of material! I like the focus on the 'holy trinity" as well as development and ownership of risks. In all my experience the risk register was the holy trinity and Excalibur rolled into one!

    The final test was terribly marred with the wrong set of data provided which would lead the student to answer...

  • Most of the challenges I have encountered are in three bins: adding/subtracting tasks, having the right personnel, and cost management. They are intricately linked, one affects the other two. But costs or the monitoring of always a challenge. It may depend on fairly trivial issues-- delays in reporting up-to-date costs, hidden costs, etc.

  • I would like to share one of the many views of the Smart Meter during my years as an executive with a US utility company. When deciding to implement, our job was to have town hall discussions on the advantages and solicit comments. I was quite surprised that even among non-rural gatherings there was a great suspicion that the smart meter would be used to spy...

  • Looking back at this very positive experience... it is i believe of much use to ones somewhat knowledgeable about new energies.. actually well aware. Not recommended for newbies, recreationalists..

  • Interesting! And the market potential of HPP!

  • This is where the rubber meets the road.. where project management by textbook knowledge meets the hard-knock world! I believe the projects that have to deal with the "unks unks" are the rule rather than the exception. My personal experience is less a cookie-cutter approach more on the job learning

  • Rudy Shankar made a comment

    Very well done! Worthy of emulation!! I think the "actors" in each technology was important but I wished there was a more global approach. What is happening in the US? In South America? And of course India and China which are soon to become leaders in electricity generation and consumption.

  • If anything the proliferation of new smart grid technologies,, investments and results of demonstrations have only exposed why ALL stakeholders need to be informed as well as aligned if not accepting of policies, market designs, regulations that will define the future grid. Cybersecurity or the lack of it is the "elephant in the room" that can disrupt these...

  • Not necessarily. Just as the mobile phone market has enabled a landline phone transition to the ever-present cell phone with functions so much more advanced than the original, consumers are paying more for cell phone service. For this has included new services. The "new" services for the future electricity market will be reflected in reduced carbon footprint...

  • Storage is the key to RE success and market penetration and will depend on not only new technologies but also efficient market design that rewards the developer for various uses. As much as the consumer will end up paying for these services, the consumer must also be made aware of the value of the electricity he/she is using. Utilities have never been good at...

  • Good point. If everyone has access to the same information then the "efficient market" theory should be operative and the tariffs would adjust accordingly. I am afraid an element for debate that may enter into this is that lower income households may not be able to act on this information (for various reasons) and the market may have the perception (or in...

  • My personal view: all of the above. The consumer pays less BUT perhaps measured in per unit energy charge and on reduced carbon footprint. And also measured by some intangible features: more resilience, better RE prediction may lead to bettwe power quality. In the US smart phones have not decreased my phone bills from the past, but on the contrary given me...

  • I like the European model to build flexibility to the grid by leveraging the complentarities of the individual nations, supporting a strong RE forecasting capability and assuring stable supply.

  • A nice overview again but perhaps too much of belaboring definitions by verbatim reporting what the US DOE and the French Ministry of Energy have to say. Could have been just displayed with the instructor emphasizing the key elements. I think the professor had it right when he emphasized that the "smartness" of the grid is required in the distribution...

  • Very nice overview for the week! An opening introduction of the topic on what is a smart grid and answering it in a short sentence would have been nice. "A smart grid is the 'dumb' grid with a communication infrastructure overlaid" would have been a simple way to start!

  • Task dependencies are sometimes obvious: you know it when you see it. But then again, some dependencies emerge during the task. For example, a resource once available for a task may be diverted to a more pressing assignment ( she is the CEO and can pull this off!) leaving you in the lurch.

  • Nice section on Planning!

  • Ahmed, I believe your project was built to fail. Your project seems it had all the elements ensuring high risk. Cultural differences, lack of trust, and inadequate on-the-ground knowledge. Perhaps the scope could have been addressed one at a time? Maybe several projects whose scopes are: a) identifying means of fraud,i.e, is it thieving? rampant disconnects?...

  • If the machine is custom manufactured, i believe it will have to be treated as a project. Otherwise, I think it should be considered routine.

  • Rudy Shankar made a comment

    After half-way through the course, I must commend Professor Yael Grushka-Cockayne in how well she has packaged the information. I think from own practical experience some of her discussion on Earliest Start Time and Latest Start Time, etc., were useful but in an academic sense. In my experience start time tweaks are always governed by a) monies authorization...

  • By far the most common mistake I have made is not having adequate tasks because I overlooked, or was reminded that we need to have that part of the scope. Estimates of task duration are another common mistake, because staff may be intimidated to claim less time, whereas the task may require more. Cannot ignore the project budget. Because in most cases this is...

  • Scoping is more arduous, you are planning for possibilities and need to be cognizant of ALL combinations of "what-ifs". From a customer standpoint the 'starter pistol" has gone off and they may be impatient in seeing their $ are being spent in planning. There is also that the perception of planning is that you still have all the tasks to complete. Good...

  • Rudy Shankar made a comment

    Q1 Have you had some experiences in having to amend your plan/s?

    I can safely say that amending a plan is the rule rather than the exception. For no plan can be so perfect that it does not need tweaking sometimes in major way!

    Q2 What were some of the challenges in doing so?

    There were many. The resources were recalculated, schedules modified and...

  • Interesting experience, Andrew. Many organizations still view project management as a means to an end-- which of course is true-- but some take a strong look at the process as a way of improving organizational efficiencies. And so post-mortems may be unwelcome, especially if the results are dire and you can be sure back-stabbing may take over instead.

  • Apropos interconnections: they would not exist at country borders if there were no mutually beneficial interests. No wonder hydroelectric fuel , i.e., water is sometimes a useful weapon of war.

  • My entire career has been working in R&D and of course project planning and defining scope within budget and time constraints were paramount. But a recent experience as a project manager charged with developing a state's energy plan that involved so MANY stakeholders was an eye opener. For as much as the stakeholders had high interest, the persons with the...

  • When I first started in my career, I attended a wonderful project management seminar held in Williamsburg, VA. The opening talk in this 5-day event was very simply put: a project like a story had a beginning, a middle and an end. And the speaker went on to say it DOES have an end!

  • Both were large projects, the first was of course by design long, very long. So many opportunities for screw ups but I believe it was fortunate that they had a willing cast and essentially well managed. So the failure ingredient in the first project was fortuitously or otherwise well managed.

    The second project Terminal 5 had all the ingredients for...

  • I love the "star" chart. An easy way to define what the scope/budget/time factors should be and the resources. Also, I would see that if the star is thick and fat, then project success would be an uphill climb! but doable with the right set of people

  • Very nicely explained. In real world projects, it may be the ones who show the most interest are also the most power in the project. When there are many powers and many interests, you could have the squeakiest wheel be the one who has the least power. Fortunately, the power and interest are mainly well correlated and aligned in real world projects

  • Maybe it is too early to talk about setting up "risk registry". All the things that can go wrong and setting up the likelihood (probability) of these events happening

  • Rudy Shankar made a comment

    Hi! I am Rudy Shankar and have had a long career in Energy, energy technologies, project management and worked around the world. Even though I have been in the business for 44 years, started my own company, was an executive with a large utility... it is never too late to learn. So here I am.. in full learning mode.. a student who wants to know more