Skip to 0 minutes and 1 secondI do think that a lot of the getting out into the world and developing Cultural Intelligence comes from having courageous conversations, sometimes with complete strangers, sometimes actually with people you've known, and sometimes with people you've known for a long, long time. I've had a lot of time and learned an awful lot from two people. Bishop Tim from the Anglican church and Skaykh Ibrahim Mogra from the Muslim faith. And they are two man who's known each other over 16 years in Leicester, East Midland of the UK. Have learned a lot from each other. Have found remarkable things in common that have-- by Flexing, have helped them to discover their own Core.

Skip to 0 minutes and 55 secondsBut also have gone through tough moments when you also discover how different their Cores are and learn to understand it, cope with it, figure out how to work together. So, these two are, to my mind, totally remarkable people talking about some difficult conversations they've had over the years. Clearly, Tim's faith and my faith have many, many things in common. But at the Core of both our faiths, there are two or three differences which are absolutely significant. And I think for me that's the Core. That is a part of me which if I give up or if I change means that I'm not me anymore. I'm something else.

Skip to 1 minute and 50 secondsOther than that, there are so many things where I actually look up to Tim to see, what is it that I can learn from his practise and the teachings of his faith that I could add to my own practise and enhance the teachings of my own faith by contrasting or complementing with what Christianity has to offer. And I have found that that has just propelled me to levels which I don't believe I would have been able to get to had I just restricted myself to simply my own faith and my own Core. So, by venturing further out, I have learned so much and enriched myself.

Skip to 2 minutes and 38 secondsAnd I believe I have made myself far more effective in reaching out to the world than I could ever have been had I just kept myself to my Core.

Skip to 2 minutes and 50 secondsMuch of that is true for me as well. I think what strikes me, Ibrahim, is that although you and I, we both have our Core non-negotiable beliefs-- which in my case have to do with how we see God in Jesus Christ.

Skip to 3 minutes and 16 secondsYou represent to me a sort of question about that.

Skip to 3 minutes and 23 secondsAnd the question goes something like this: given that my Core is pretty clear to me, how is it that somebody who does not share that core clearly reveals holiness and something of God to me? So, I think that a relationship with you and conversations with people of your faith over many years here doesn't undermine the Core. But it constantly puts it into a wider context. It constantly makes me have to revisit it and think, OK, what is it about holding onto this that really is essential? And how is it that somebody who does not hold onto this shows in their own life the very qualities that I rather-- not only admire, but rather envy.

Skip to 4 minutes and 25 secondsAnd I think as a person who's a religious leader, what that does is make me realise that any claims I make about God are always somewhat partial. That God is, in the end, God and cannot be reduced to any formulas, however profound and however deep seated I might live by.

Deep beliefs

Sometimes we will be working together on an issue that touches our Core, and it touches the other person’s Core too. We are in an area which is pretty solid for us both, and on which we have both decided that Flexing is pretty unlikely.

Faith is an interesting example. What happens when one faith meets a different one, and both are deep in Core. Are clashes inevitable? Is the evidence in the modern world that the prospect of harmony is slim?

Have a look at the following video.

  • Where else do clashes of Core take place?

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This video is from the free online course:

Developing Cultural Intelligence for Leadership

Common Purpose