Skip main navigation
We use cookies to give you a better experience, if that’s ok you can close this message and carry on browsing. For more info read our cookies policy.
We use cookies to give you a better experience. Carry on browsing if you're happy with this, or read our cookies policy for more information.
Collage of people and buildings

Why is type 1 diabetes increasing?

We have seen that around the world diabetes is increasing. In Australia, around 280 new cases of diabetes are diagnosed each day, and most of these are type 2 diabetes.

Several studies and reports show an increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes around the world.

What are the reasons for the rise in type 1 diabetes?

A paper by Francesco Maria Ergo (2013) reviews some recent hypotheses about why type 1 diabetes is increasing:

Hygiene hypothesis: exposure to a variety of infectious agents in early childhood appears to be protective in type 1 diabetes. The proposed mechanism is that the cells of the infectious agent prevents the cells of the immune system damaging insulin-producing pancreatic cells.

Viral hypothesis: some viruses (including enterovirus, rubella, mumps and cytomegalovirus) may start or speed up the autoimmune process in type 1 diabetes.

Vitamin D deficiency: type 1 diabetes is higher in countries with less sunshine, and children treated with vitamin D have a lower risk of type 1 diabetes.

Breastfeeding versus cow’s milk hypothesis: proposed mechanisms are that (1) breastmilk may contain protective factors and (2) proteins present in cow’s milk formula may trigger type 1 diabetes.

Currently, there is the strongest support for the hygiene hypothesis.

Your task

Read the article by Egro (2013). The below questions should guide your reading:

  • What are the reasons for the rise of type 1 diabetes discussed in the article?
  • Are the same reasons at play for the increase in type 2 diabetes?
  • What can we do as a society to reduce the incidence of diabetes?

Post your response to these questions in the comments. Try to use evidence and scientific reasoning, rather than opinion.

Note: Those with less time and/or experience with reading journal articles may wish to read just the abstract and the conclusion as a starting point.

Share this article:

This article is from the free online course:

Demystifying Diabetes

Deakin University

Get a taste of this course

Find out what this course is like by previewing some of the course steps before you join:

  • Living with diabetes
    Living with diabetes
    video

    In this video, you will meet Beth and hear about her experience of being diagnosed with diabetes as a young adult and of living with type 1 diabetes.

Contact FutureLearn for Support