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Getting the most out of this course

Not every country in the world speaks the same language, and the same is true for the legal systems that each nation state chooses to use. It certainly would be easier for us all to learn if every legal system was the same structure across the globe.

The laws we look at in this course come under a system known as the common law. This is the system that is used by most countries that were originally colonised by the English. It is a mixture of customary law, judge-made law and parliamentary law.

Today, many nations, like Australia, still use the common law as a foundational feature of their legal system. Barbados, Bangladesh, Brunei, Canada, England and Wales, Hong Kong, India, Israel, Kenya, Malaysia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Pakistan, Ireland, Scotland, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, the United States, and many others – all have legal systems that owe their heritage to the common law.

Although we explore law through an Australian common law lens, there will be plenty of opportunities for you to apply the law from your jurisdiction to the case studies, discussions and tasks throughout the course.

This course is not designed to be legal advice. If you have any significant concerns it's better that you do not to discuss those concerns with other learners and seek professional advice and support.

Continue the conversation

For those of you who use Twitter, consider following @LawNonLaw and use the hashtag #FLLawNonLaw to stay informed of course-related news and events, and to keep in touch with other learners outside this course. Joining Twitter or following @LawNonLaw is entirely optional.


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This article is from the free online course:

Law for Non-Lawyers: Introduction to Law

Monash University