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Glossary

You may find that in this course we use terminology that you are unfamiliar with. This is why we have created this glossary of terms used in the course.

If you think that there are any terms missing from this glossary that might be useful to fellow learners, please let us know in the comments.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

B

Bascinet - a type of helmet

Bombard - a large type of gun designed for siege warfare

D

Depose - to remove a person from high office

G

Gauntlets - armoured gloves

Gorget - neck armour

Greaves - shin armour

H

Hauberk - a long mail shirt

Homage - To acknowledge a person’s authority and to promise to show that person respect and loyalty e.g. Edward III gave homage to Philip VI

I

Indenture - a contract (to provide troops)

M

Melee - a fight. This word comes from French and implies chaos and confusion in a close fight. It is often used to describe weapons used in close fighting e.g. ‘melee weapons’.

Muster - an assembly of soldiers for inspection and roll call

Muster roll - a document which lists the names of groups of men ready and prepared to fight in a battle campaign. Men were usually mustered and recorded under the name of each commander.

P

Pairs of plates - cloth armour with riveted plates inside

Poleaxe - a weapon on a wooden shaft incorporating an axe or hammer head

Poleyns - knee armour

primary source - a term historians use for original documents or materials written at the time of the events that they describe

R

Rerebrace - upper arm armour

Retinue - a group of soldiers in the service of a more senior individual e.g. in this course, we talk about the retinue of Sir Thomas Erpingham

S

Sabaton - foot armour

Sallet - a type of helmet

Secondary source - a term historians use for documents or materials which are written after the events they describe. Secondary sources are often based on primary sources and other sources for their information.

U

Usurp - to take power (e.g. the crown) by force or illegally e.g. Henry usurped the throne.

V

vanguard - the advance guard or formation of an army

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Agincourt 1415: Myth and Reality

University of Southampton

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