Skip to 0 minutes and 4 secondsAs a result of participating in this course, you've been involved in examining evidence from your own learners, analysing teachers in action, thinking about the evidence that questioning can produce, and how to interpret it in terms of students' learning needs, and exploring teachers' own reflections on formative assessment. You may have spotted particular approaches that you could use, and you may have thought of different or better ways of handling things. It may have struck you, as it did us when we were developing this course, that the boundary between hinge-point questions and other kinds of formative questions is a bit more blurred than we've tended to make it out to be.

Skip to 0 minutes and 40 secondsOne thing you may have thought about is the extent to which hinge-point questions are reusable between teachers in a way that perhaps lesson plans, tasks, and activities are less so. Because the latter are rather more context dependent. And, as Jonathan Lye stresses in his interview, writing effective hinge-point questions takes time and practise. This is partly because small changes can result in big improvements to the quality of the evidence elicited by a question. But it's also because a lot of care is needed of a choice of distractors which can, as Jonathan explains, sometimes usefully be based on the kinds of misunderstandings you know your learners are likely to have.

Skip to 1 minute and 22 secondsBut overall, we hope that this part of the course will have helped you get a better understanding of what excellent formative practise involves. We are now going to draw the course to a close by asking you to summarise for yourself whether, and if yes, how, doing the course has developed your ideas about assessment for learning. We will also show you an area of the National Science Learning Network's website where you can share hinge-point questions with other STEM teachers.

Feedback from Dylan

In this video Dylan begins to draw the course to a close emphasising:

  • how the boundary between hinge-point questions and other kinds of formative questions is somewhat blurred;

  • the extent to which hinge-point questions are reusable between teachers in a way that perhaps lesson plans, tasks, and activities are less so.

This final part of the course involves:

  • asking you to reflect whether doing this course has developed your ideas about assessment for learning, and if yes, how;

  • gaining access, if you have have already contributed, to the crowd-sourced repository of hinge-point questions generated by learners on this course.

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This video is from the free online course:

Assessment for Learning in STEM Teaching

National STEM Learning Centre