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Thought experiment: Effectiveness of the questions you ask

In this article, you are asked to examine the effectiveness of a data collection tool and analyze ways to increase it's effectiveness (Step 3.7).
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© Copyright @ 2020 Johns Hopkins University. Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 license.

Before you watch the next video, let’s conduct a thought experiment. Return to the poll that you completed at the beginning of the course Why are you taking this online course, “Collecting and Using Data for Disease Control and Global Health Decision-making”?.

Review the list of answer options. Consider these questions:

  • How accurately did any of these options capture your actual motivations for taking the course?

  • Did you have to decide between more than one?

  • Did any options seem completely useless in this context?

  • How could you change the answer options to improve the data collection?

  • Was the poll question even a useful question to ask? How might you change the question to make the poll more effective?

© Copyright @ 2020 Johns Hopkins University. Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 license.
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Collecting and Using Data for Disease Control and Global Health Decision-Making

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