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Why This Relocation Happened?

Why this relocation happened? Read to learn more.

It was impossible to keep the Noguchi Room how it was, and it was relocated in 2003. Niikura interviewed Professor Watanabe about this relocation debacle. Please watch the video.

(Note) “Bibi” mentioned by Niikura in the video is an abbreviation for the Department of Aesthetics and Science of Arts, Keio University Faculty of Letters.

What was your impression of the interview with Professor Watanabe? If you’ve experienced any similar events in your life, please tell us about them.

Videos in the Steps so far have looked at the two spaces: the Noguchi Room (before relocation) and Ex-Noguchi Room (after relocation). Here, let’s review some key points by looking at photos.

Ex-Noguchi Room after relocation
(©Keio University Art Center, photos: Ryota Atarashi)
Ex-Noguchi Room 1 A spiral staircase that previously connected between floors, but currently doesn’t connect to anything
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Ex-Noguchi Room 2 This spiral staircase was not dismantled. It was removed during demolition of the Second Faculty Building and relocated to its current position
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Ex-Noguchi Room 3 Looking at the interior through a curtain where there was previously a wall
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Ex-Noguchi Room 4 Columns flanking the fireplace are cut off midway through because the ceiling has been removed
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Ex-Noguchi Room 5 Since the ceiling is gone, light also shines down from the windows on the second floor, and the interior is brighter than before relocation.
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Ex-Noguchi Room 6 Part of the Second Faculty Building containing the Ex-Noguchi Room, relocated to the third-floor terrace of the South Building (Law School Building). This relocated section is the only example of Taniguchi’s architecture still remaining on the Mita Campus.
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Ex-Noguchi Room 7 Upper and lower windows inspired by the Mita Enzetsu-kan are combined with the style of modern architecture, featuring extensive use of straight lines, and continuous windows. The eaves of the horizontally protruding cantilever structure show Taniguchi’s characteristic mastery as a modern architect.
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Noguchi Room before relocation
View of the garden and Mu View of the garden and Mu from the interior. The composite art created by Noguchi is apparent in this scene. (Photo: Takeshi Taira, source: Keio University Art Center)
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Second Faculty Building seen from Mu Second Faculty Building seen from Mu. This garden at the outer edge of the campus was blocked off from rest of the campus by the Second Faculty Building, creating a quiet space. (Photo: Takeshi Taira, source: Keio University Art Center)
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comparison of the floor plans A comparison of the floor plans before and after relocation shows that only the Noguchi Room was cut out and relocated. Click to take a closer look

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Invitation to Ex-Noguchi Room: Preservation and Utilization of Cultural Properties in Universities

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