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Your first draft

Time for you to get your ideas down.
Student drinking coffee and reading a book outside
© University of East Anglia

Now is the point where you need to start writing. Have a go at writing your first draft, using all the things that Gina learnt when she wrote hers and think about the feedback she received on her first draft.

Ask yourself the same questions Gina asked. If you found it hard to say that something was irrelevant, don’t worry, many people will be finding this bit difficult too. It is generally hard to write to a word limit.

If you are finding the writing task difficult you might find it useful to put it down for a day and come back to it with fresh eyes. Being critical of your own writing is difficult if you try to edit it straight after writing it.

  • Did you find the task easy or difficult?

Part of the writing and reviewing process is reflection. The starting part of reflection is to recognise what you find easy or difficult. The next stage is to think why this is so.

© University of East Anglia
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