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Introduction to Week 2

Introduction to Week 2
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Welcome to Week 2 of this online course on the beginnings of Quakerism and its radical ideas. Last week we met George Fox, heard about his religious ideas, and his ascent of Pendle Hill in Lancashire, where he saw there was a “great people to be gathered”. Fox travelled on through Airton and Dent, to Sedbergh. And this week focuses on his experiences there. He stays at Brigflatts, now the site of a historic meeting house, preaches up a tree in Sedbergh churchyard, rather than in the church, and gains hundreds of converts through his preaching on Firbank Fell the following Sunday.
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What starts as an uncertain welcome from the local people turns into a major preaching success for Fox, and the start of a mass Quaker movement, beginning here in the Northwest of England. We’ll hear from Hilary Hinds on how Quakers were known for their travelling, or itinerance. And from Angus Winchester, on how George Fox was received in Sedbergh. They’ll be some text from local farmer Francis Howgill to explore. And also a focus on the inward nature of Quaker spirituality. The week ends with another quiz.
Watch this short video, in which we will introduce the material to be covered this week.
We will hear about Fox’s arrival in Sedbergh from Angus Winchester, Hilary Hinds will explain why travel was so important for early Quakers, and we will discuss the place of “inwardness” as a theological idea.
Hilary will also help us understand the role that “the North” had in helping Quakers create shared and distinct identity.
Hopefully you will have a better understanding of the tagging feature new to this course now. In this week try to re-use tags which relate to an interesting theme, so others can focus down on the invaluable peer contributions. If you haven’t tried using a hashtag yet, give it a go this week! – #sociallearning #commentdiscovery
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Radical Spirituality: the Early History of the Quakers

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