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Prevention and Biosecurity

Prevention and biosecurity video.

Biosecurity, as defined by the FAO, is a strategic and integrated approach that encompasses the policy and regulatory frameworks (including instruments and activities) for analysing and managing relevant risks to human, animal and plant life and health, and associated risks to the environment.

Biosecurity covers food safety, zoonoses, the introduction of animal and plant diseases and pests, and the introduction and management of invasive alien species. Thus biosecurity is a holistic concept of direct relevance to the sustainability of agriculture, and wide-ranging aspects of public health and protection of the environment, including biological diversity.

Furthermore, global distribution of animal feed permits the dissemination of pathogens to geographical areas, individual farms and susceptible livestock that were previously unexposed.

In addition, livestock moving between farms and between countries facilitates the transmission of disease. This is often compounded by the stress associated with the transport and the mixing of strange groups of animals.

A series of problems in the food industry, culminating in bovine spongiform encephalopathy, has focused the spotlight on practices in feed mills and farms. The Public Health consequences of failure of controls and inappropriate practices at this level emphasise the fact that farming and milling are food businesses and are just as much an integral part of the food chain as caterers and retailers.

Furthermore, global distribution of animal feed permits the dissemination of pathogens to geographical areas, individual farms and susceptible livestock that were previously unexposed. Similarly, livestock moving between farms and between countries facilitates the transmission of disease. This is often compounded by the stress associated with the transport and the mixing of strange groups of animals.

A series of problems in the food industry, culminating in bovine spongiform encephalopathy, has focused the spotlight on practices in feed mills and farms.

The public health consequences of failure of controls and inappropriate practices at this level emphasise the fact that farming and milling are food businesses and are just as much an integral part of the food chain as caterers and retailers.

A link to European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) ‘From Field to Fork’ has been provided here and in the Downloads area for you to explore.

Please share any thoughts that you have about the video, the EFSA webpage or the summary provided above in the discussion area.

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Farm to Fork: Sustainable Food Production in a Changing Environment

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