Allan Gaw

Allan Gaw

- MD, PhD
- Worked in clinical research for 30 years.
- Find out more about me and my work at www.allangaw.com and follow my research education and training blog at https://researchet.wordpress.com

Location Scotland

Activity

  • Allan Gaw made a comment

    Thank you for taking part in the four-week course. Our formal facilitation for this run is now over, but you will still have access to the materials for a further two weeks to allow you to view any modules that you wish to complete, or to revisit any of the sections that you want to look at again.

    It has been a pleasure working with you all, and I very...

  • Allan Gaw made a comment

    Thank you for taking part in the four-week course. Our formal facilitation for this run is now over, but you will still have access to the materials for a further two weeks to allow you to view any modules that you wish to complete, or to revisit any of the sections that you want to look at again.

    It has been a pleasure working with you all, and I very...

  • Allan Gaw made a comment

    Thank you for taking part in the four-week course. Our formal facilitation for this run is now over, but you will still have access to the materials for a further two weeks to allow you to view any modules that you wish to complete, or to revisit any of the sections that you want to look at again.

    It has been a pleasure working with you all, and I very...

  • Thank you for taking part in the four-week course. Our formal facilitation for this run is now over, but you will still have access to the materials for a further two weeks to allow you to view any modules that you wish to complete, or to revisit any of the sections that you want to look at again.

    It has been a pleasure working with you all, and I very...

  • You’re most welcome, Leeh.

  • Welcome to the course, Leeh. I hope you enjoy it and find it useful.

  • Hello @DrArathiR and welcome to the course. I hope you enjoy it and find it interesting.

  • Hello @CharmaineEstember and welcome to the course. I hope you enjoy it and find it interesting and informative.

  • Thanks for this, Millicent. It’s always useful to see how consent works in different countries.

  • Welcome to the course, Urvashi. I hope you find it interesting and informative.

  • Allan Gaw made a comment

    Welcome back to week 4 of the course. In this, our final week, we will be focussing in more detail on what becomes of the results of research. In particular, we will be looking at how these results are shared and how they may be reported in the media. I do hope you find the modules this week interesting and informative and, again, I very much look forward...

  • It is considered ethical and appropriate for one person to give consent on behalf of another, but of course the specific circumstances and the relationship between the people are important. The law in the UK relating to who, how and when proxy consent in adults is allowed is quite clear when it comes to research involving investigational medicinal products...

  • I think your final comment is the key here. Yes, we are eager to use new technologies to facilitate our research but ultimately the acceptability and utility of such approaches will depend on how potential research participants and indeed potential researchers view these. We need to involve everyone in the conversation.

  • When we talk of virtual trials we are talking about studies where participants have consented to be part of the study and their follow-up and monitoring is done in a virtual way to save time and money.

    The governance of available data sets is one of the biggest issues currently in health related research. There is clearly huge potential is being able to...

  • Welcome, Theodora. I hope you find the course interesting and informative.

  • Hi Betsy and welcome to the MOOC. I hope you find it useful and enjoyable.

  • Allan Gaw made a comment

    Welcome back to week 3 of the course. This time we will be focusing on the ethical aspects of clinical research. We will be looking at how our approach has developed over time and we will focus on the importance of valid informed consent as the foundation of all ethical research. I do hope you find the modules this week interesting and informative and I look...

  • Hello Hania and welcome to the course. I hope you find it interesting and informative.

  • Hi Kate and welcome to the course. I hope you enjoy it and find it informative.

  • @MILLICENTOUMA — Yes, anything we can do to help people feel comfortable and at ease means that they can concentrate on the information we are sharing with them and carefully consider what we are asking of them.

  • Welcome to the course, Alison. I hope you find it interesting and enjoyable.

  • Allan Gaw made a comment

    A very warm welcome to everyone returning for week 2 of the course. This time we will be looking at some important aspects of good research design, and, as well as thinking about where research might have begun, we will also be looking at where it might be going. I do hope you find the modules this week interesting.

  • Hello Zee and welcome to the course. I hope you find it useful.

  • Hello to you too, Florence. Welcome to the course. I hope you enjoy it and find it useful and informative.

  • Clinical research is important to me because since studying medicine I have been trying to offer my patients the best healthcare possible. Even now, we still do not understand many diseases and some of the treatments we are able to offer for others are far from perfect. The only way we can improve things is through research. Nothing else works.

  • Hello and welcome to the course Abdurahman. I hope you find it useful. While the course is free to all, the Future Learn model only offers certificates to those who upgrade.

  • Yes, such an approach does pose challenges but also presents real opportunities. But, as you say, these can be worked out.

  • Hello Carlos, and welcome to the course. I hope you find it interesting and informative and that it helps with your career plans.

  • Hi Simran, and welcome to the MOOC. I hope you find it useful and enjoyable.

  • Hello Harsha and welcome to the course. I hope you find it interesting and informative.

  • Hi Dionne and welcome to the course. I hope you find it useful and enjoyable.

  • Hello Evangelina and welcome to the course. I hope you enjoy it and find it interesting.

  • I think that’s an important consideration for all researchers—what will be the impact and the consequences of my research for the future?

  • @RachelElizabethknightLozano Welcome to the course—I hope you find it useful and enjoyable.

  • Hi Doyin and welcome to the MOOC. I hope you enjoy it and find it interesting.

  • Welcome to the course, Ayogu. I hope you enjoy it and find it useful and informative.

  • Hi Mia and welcome to the course. I hope you find it useful for your studies.

  • Welcome to the course, Susana. I hope you find it useful and informative.

  • Hello Angela and welcome to the MOOC. I hope you find it interesting and enjoyable.

  • Welcome to the course, Clare-Marie. I do hope you find it interesting and informative.

  • Good to have you with us, Mary. I hope you find the course interesting and enjoyable.

  • Welcome to the course, Jo-Ann. I hope you enjoy it and find it interesting.

  • A very warm welcome to those joinIng the course for our next mentored run starting on May 24, 2021. Over the next four weeks, my colleagues and I will be available to take part on the discussion boards and to answer any specific questions you might have.

    I do hope you enjoy the first week of the course, where we will be looking at what exactly Clinical...

  • Good to hear, Julia. Thank you for that feedback.

  • Thank you for your feedback, Domenika. Glad to hear you found the course informative and engaging.

  • Hello Lisa and welcome to the course. I do hope you enjoy it and find it useful for your work.

  • Glad to hear your views of the course. Thanks for joining us.

  • Welcome to the course Juan Carlos. I hope you find it interesting and informative.

  • These antibiotics cannot be administered subcutaneously and nor can many other drugs.

  • Yes, the media and social media in particular are double edged swords. Perhaps it’s not these forms of communication themselves that are of concern but how they are used by certain individuals and groups.

  • Indeed there was and Lind was unaware that heating the citrus juice might neutralise it’s active ingredient.

  • No the MHRA cannot offer peer review, only those who are experts in a particular field of study can do that. In practice, if say, an NHS R&D Department wishes to know whether a study is scientifically sound and it has not undergone the rigour of peer review elsewhere, they will ask recognised experts in the field to review the protocol and pass comment on it.

  • Thank you for that feedback, Jill.

  • Welcome to the course, Noelle. I hope you find it meets your needs and that you find it interesting.

  • Not just in Germany and not just pre-war. There are plenty of instances of unethical research that we could cite in the UK even in our lifetimes. That’s why it’s so important never to let our ethical standards slip. What is hard fought for can be so easily be reversed.

  • @ShaimaaEldeeb Welcome to the course. I hope you find it useful and enjoyable.

  • @CarolRoughley Welcome to the MOOC. I do hope you enjoy it and find it interesting.

  • Hello Raavi and welcome to the course. I hope you find it useful and informative.

  • Allan Gaw made a comment

    Welcome back to week 4 of the course. In this, our final week, we will be focussing in more detail on what becomes of the results of research. In particular, we will be looking at how these results are shared and how they may be reported in the media. I do hope you find the modules this week interesting and informative and, again, I very much look forward...

  • I think these are reasonable concerns but I know that lay people often provide some of the most important input of all into a REC’s deliberations. Perhaps some of our other learners who are lay members of a REC might want to comment.

  • Hello Humairah and welcome to the MOOC. I hope you find it interesting and enjoyable.

  • Hello Issimatou and welcome to the course. I hope you find it interesting and enjoyable.

  • For many rare genetic diseases, the children do not survive to adulthood. The only way to improve the quality and quantity of their lives is to study the children with the disease.

  • That’s a whole other story and as you rightly suggest is an ethical dilemma. Is it more disrespectful to discard any useful research findings gathered by such unethical means, than to honour that suffering by at least trying to use it to help others? There is no answer to that question and different groups have taken very different stances. One thing worth...

  • Hi and welcome to the MOOC, Rose. I hope you find it interesting and informative.

  • I think to suggest that researchers have no respect for privacy is both unwarranted and unfair. Huge efforts are made at all levels in clinical research to carry out the often sensitive work as respectfully as possible. Undoubtedly there have been individual cases where this has not been the case and these make the headlines, but the vast majority of research...

  • If patient data is truly anonymised there should be no key because there should be no way of identifying the information. Within the day to day running of a clinical trial, the patient data are only partially anonymised so that those working with it cannot identify individuals. For example, a patient might be identified by a patient number rather than their...

  • The design of the trial is reviewed, but not by a REC. The protocol of the trial should undergo peer review before it can proceed. This will often happen at the funding stage. If not, NHS management review of the study by the R&D Department will seek peer review of the study to satisfy themselves that the study is scientifically sound enough to proceed.

  • The laws relating to consent are complex and difficult to interpret in the context of clinical research. This is made even more challenging when we consider that not only are the laws different in different countries, they are also different in different parts of the UK.

  • The UK law as it stands does not allow such information to be given back to an individual if they did not consent to the test in question being done. This means that if, for example, a newly developed test for a genetic marker for cancer is performed on a stored sample, the researchers cannot report the results to the subject of that sample. The law is...

  • Glad you enjoyed it, Jane.

  • There is nothing lowly about being a volunteer, Becca.

  • There are very clear laws in the UK and in most other countries governing who can give consent when it comes to studies involving any kind of medication, including vaccines. Failure to follow these laws is not just bad practice, it is a criminal offence. The kind of proxy consent you are describing, is well set out in these laws.