Nicholas Embleton

Nicholas Embleton

Professor of Neonatal Medicine with >25 years experience in large NICU. Lead research programmes in neonatal nutrition & work with parents
www.neonatalresearch.net
www.neonatalbutterflyproject.org

Location Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Activity

  • @KyliePussell thanks so much for doing the course and your insights and experience. It is really important that health professionals take time to truly listen to parents. We really appreciate your efforts. Thanks

  • I agree. The video is so powerful

  • thanks for joining ; please spread the word

  • @LauraAtherton thanks ; fully agree, we need so much more research

  • thanks Anna. Please share the word through all of your contacts, consultants, trainees, HSTs etc.

  • thanks for joining. It would be brilliant if you could share this across EoE, with network leads, managers, heads of midwifery and spread the word across the IBCLC community. Thanks so much

  • Interesting. I will also admit i never thought about this in the past, even though in my 30+ year career in neonatology i cared for 100's of babies who sadly died. I have no idea how many of their mothers might have wanted to know this was an option.

  • we agree! Speak to your line managers!!

  • that's great and thanks for joining; pleased you found it useful - please share with colleagues, team leads and networks if you can.

  • Thanks for joining. Check out our other course on loss in a multiple pregnancy. Also on future learn.

  • Pleased you are enjoying it

  • I was blown away by Holly’s honesty when I first heard her speak. Amazing.

  • Thanks very much for joining and thanks for sharing. We’re pleased you found it useful

  • Yup. We’re all going to need to help educate our teams.

  • Welcome. Hope it was useful

  • Hi. Thanks for joining

  • @CharlotteJackson can you please share with your directorate managers and ask them to cascade to all staff in your teams - including neonatal, and paediatric, obstetric, nursing & medical? We would really appreciate that. Women deserve to know the options, and we can only do that if everyone knows what the choices are. Even if they don't feel comfortable...

  • thanks for joining ; if you find the course useful, can you please share with your directorate managers and ask them to cascade to all staff in your teams - including neonatal, and paediatric, obstetric, nursing & medical? We would really appreciate that. Women deserve to know the options, and we can only do that if everyone knows what the choices are. Even if...

  • thanks for the feedback. We are all learning! All of us. Different parents, cultures, support, societies - we can all learn from each other

  • I agree ; please don't be scared. One mother said "...the very worst thing that could ever happen to me, had already happened. My baby had died. I wanted to know the options so I could make a choice for myself."

    Any 'discomfort' we might feel as health professionals [in discussing the options] is minimal when compared to the shock and grief a bereaved...

  • @IsabelAraya OK, let us think offline, email me nicholas.embleton@ncl.ac.uk when you have time!

  • Charlotte that’s brilliant. Can you give is an idea of how many women are receptive to the idea at your hospital?

  • yes, reproductive health can feel very brutal at times

  • @IsabelAraya thanks - interested to know how you think this might be 'accepted' in South America?

  • interesting that you had two mothers with differing views ; it shows how 'individual' it is

  • thanks Sharon, really helpful insights.

  • I agree. When I first heard of this, I was genuinely a little uncertain what I thought about it; but I quickly decided that my role as a HCP was to explain and offer women a choice, rather than deny them a choice because of my own preferences.

  • agree, that language is really important. However, interruption still doesn't feel quite right to me!

  • I agree; must be unbelievably hard

  • Thanks Amy

  • Thanks Sharon. Really helpful consideration

  • Is such a powerful video

  • Thanks for joining. Hope its useful

  • Of course. I've also been caught out like this ; caring for a baby that no one had told me had a twin who had died. Now the use of the Butterfly cot card helps

  • thanks Helen, we agree! If you have any good ideas as to how we can improve dissemination and better raise awareness especially via NHS, please let us know

  • That most have been hard and surprising. So difficult when you don’t know what happened.

  • That is probably OK for a larger healthy baby, say 28-32 weeks, but this could be problematic in a 25 week baby as they may not get enough lipid, especially if they do not tolerate full feeds in next 2-3 days. There needs to be a balance between not leaving baby in PN/long line for longer than needed, but at the same time, not depriving a vulnerable baby of...

  • I'm sorry if you wanted a simple answer.

    To every complex problem, there is a simple answer that is wrong.

  • Fortifier is not used routinely post-discharge but some NICUs do use. Whilst it seems 'sensible' to provide fortifier to some babies there are challenges. 1) it is not marketed/available for use in this way 2) babies feeding ad-lib regulate volume intake to achieve caloric (not protein) requirements. All babies regulate on calories, unless they have complex...

  • @HilaryLum I'm visiting Auckland to spend couple of days with `Frank Bloomfield & team next week!

  • welcome! which country/city are you working in

  • great, best of luck with the PhD