Mark Guglielmetti

Mark Guglielmetti

Mark Guglielmetti is a researcher, academic and media artist. He currently lectures in Digital Art and Communication Design at Monash Art Design & Architecture (MADA) at Monash University.

Location Melbourne, Australia

Activity

  • Hi Veronica
    Yikes! Yes you are completely correct - must have been a slip up. Thanks for the heads up and changes are in the pipeline.
    Best
    Mark

  • Hi Gabor, thanks for the link - it provides is a simple description of the idea and puts it into the larger contested field. The description however doesn't fully unpack a systems approach to creativity (Csikszentmihályi) or the field of cultural production (Bourdieu) both of which I am exploring in the video.
    Mark

  • Hi Penelope, have you tried downloading the video? If not right click on the video and choose 'save as'. Hopefully you wont have any more problems.
    Mark

  • Patents are difficult to enforce especially when artists and hackers get involved. Microsoft's Kinect is a great example - a bounty of $3000 was offered to the first person to hack and deliver an open source driver for the device. It was hacked (2010) and the code released to an eagerly awaiting array of misfits, artists, programmers etc who collectively...

  • Hi Michael, nice one - I haven't seen this video so thanks for the link!
    Cheers
    Mark

  • Hi Robert, Yes but ENIAC was the first general purpose computer built.
    Cheers
    Mark

  • Hi Malcom, creativity is a complex concept which we briefly examine in week 3. That aside you might be interested in the work by musician David Cope who uses AI processes in his Experiments in Musical Intelligence program to create new works based on the works of various composers (Chopin and others). The new works have been highly successful so much so that...

  • Hi all, we discuss this issue in Week 3 Creativity. It's an interesting area not least because computer scientists are develop 'artificial art critics' that measure the success of visual art! It does lead us to the bigger question though.. how do humans measure the success of art and creativity??
    Cheers
    Mark

  • Hi Mark, Your comments remind me of the art collaboration between Harold Cohen and AARON (a computer program). Cohen developed and has been working with AARON for about 42 years and argues AARON is his collaborator and not simply a program. We discuss this relationship in week 3. I also think 'life' is a continuum but have a different perspective - I don't...

  • Hi Geraldine, I agree, there is something quite existential about AI and artificial life - which I think will have a major impact in how we think about 'life' in the later half of this century. We start to unpack this in the week 3 discussion on creativity but also in the discussion on artificial life in week 6.
    Cheers
    Mark

  • Hi Gurpreet, there are many entry points into creating an output from code, sometimes there is the traditional route, such as doing a computer science degree, or non-traditional say from philosophical enquiry (like me), some people like creating images, moving images, audio, sculpture or other forms of computer generated outputs like smell! We've tried to...

  • Hi Chloe, great question (and point taken!). We have kept the conceptual framework for week one very accessible so the works selected are exemplars that easily describe the basic principles of creative coding. Over the next five weeks we discuss more complex themes and include works by female and male artists that support the themes being...

  • Hi Anthony, the videos are uploaded to Future Learn in high definition. They are all downloadable; just right click on the video and choose save as. They look really crisp when I download them to my phone or desktop and look fine when I stream them. Try again and let me know how you get on.
    Cheers
    Mark

  • We've revised some of the material but overall its much the same as last year. So, if you didn't find all the rabbit holes there are more to find. :)

  • Hi Walter
    Great to have you on board! The course covers a bit of terrain and we do talk about ideas that might be considered outside of computing. But as you'll see in week 3 and 6 we draw into the mix ideas about 'creativity' and 'life' as these themes are of specific interest to computer scientists who are attempting to understand and model them. We have...

  • Hi Ray,
    Creativity, which is what your observation touches on, is a complex issue: can a machine be creative and if so what criteria is used to measure its creativity? Criteria determined by humans or by the machine itself? Or by society and community? We discuss 'Creativity' in some detail in week 3.

    We also discuss artificial life systems in week 6 to...

  • Hi designjuju (such a great name!), you might be interested in the work done by the folks at Nervous System such as the kinematic dress - a dress that has been printed out in 3D as a single form (no stitching required). Check it out here:
    http://n-e-r-v-o-u-s.com/projects/sets/kinematics-dress/
    Cheers
    Mark

  • Hi James, firstly welcome to Creative Coding.
    Yes the videos can be downloaded and have been optimised for smart phones, tablets etc so the file sizes are quite small. Just right click on the video and select 'Save Video As' and download.
    Let us know if you have any problems and we'll try to sort it out.
    Hope you enjoy the course.
    Cheers
    Mark

  • Hi Ken, welcome back! It's great to see you found the course enjoyable last year. Hope your able to finish it this time around - and hopefully you can explore all the rabbit holes (there are so many!).
    Cheers
    Mark

  • Thanks Bill, I'll take a look at the compendium - it looks like an interesting read. The Ferranti Sirius is still at Monash - it features briefly in the Creative Coding trailer (around 55 secs into the video). An acoustic memory card! Nice one. Make sure to keep it safe! Hope the weather is still sunny!

  • Hi Don
    I think the first fully electronic computer was the ABC (1941) and the 10 Colossus machines (which may have been the first programmable computers) were built between 1943-45. ENIAC was the first general purpose computer (which I should have elaborated on in the video).

    It is great to unpack this all for the learners!! Excellent stuff!

  • Hi Cliff

    Thanks for your comments. Yes exactly my point, ENIAC really fuelled the public imagination and the metaphor of the ‘giant brain’ helped to give context (albeit highly exaggerated) to the machine.

    I believe the ABC (1941?) was the first fully electronic computer. It was limited to calculating linear equations. Colossus (1943?) was dedicated to...

  • When I wrote this discussion activity I was thinking about how various hearing impaired communities have adapted gesture into vastly complex language systems, such as Auslan or BSL, for their constituencies (non-hearing and hearing). Of course they have created standards for their constituencies - these standards are highly sophisticated naturalised languages....

  • Hi Fiona
    Yes William Latham's work is really interesting. We talk about him in week 6 when we discuss artificial life!!

    Hope you are enjoying the course!!

    Mark

  • Hi David, I've included a link to Camille's Text Rain for our discussion on typography in week 5. Great that you posted the link though!!

    Best

    Mark

  • Hi Michael. Thanks for the positive feedback (which is very encouraging!) We really wanted to create a course that would show an amazing range of projects that would inspire learners to ... learn! But also to dismantle some preconceived ideas about computer art and what it means/is. So far so good :)

    Your code for the 'tapestry' design is very efficient -...

  • Hey Michael, Nice one! The colours are crazy - the blue lines make the generative image appear to modulate in a very strange fashion - great! I agree, the Nature of Code by Dan Shiffman is a good read.

    Hope you enjoy the courses.

    Mark

  • Hi Marwan

    Thanks for your astute observation! Yes, I'm not sure how I came to this obviously mistaken conclusion but I will fix it for the next iteration of the course.

    I was going to use a generative image that was created by a friend who was inspired by the Alhambra but I think the image I used from the Metropolitan Museum of Art...

  • Hey Neroli!! Great that you can join us! Yes, it's been some time :) Hope you enjoy the course!! I'll be keeping my eye on your progress :) !!

  • Hi Nigel, thanks for the feedback. Yes, you are quite correct Islam did not exist 2500 yrs ago! I'm not quite sure how I came to this conclusion. Let's put it down to a mistake. I'll resolve the issue in the next iteration of the course.

    The image is from The Metropolitan Museum of Art...

  • Hi Bill, Welcome! It's pretty miserable here in Melbourne. I'd like to be with you enjoying the sun and that drink! You are correct - the course will keep your nose to the grindstone! Hope you enjoy it and ... keep coding.

    Cheers

    Mark