Elaine Lee

Elaine Lee

I am a midwife of 20 years and am a Senior Lecturer at the University of Dundee, responsible for internationalisation in the School of Nursing and Health Sciences. I am a lead educator with the SISSC

Activity

  • I think it's important to remember that it's his baby, and that we only have the midwife's view on the father's behaviour. For me it's about helping people to look after their babies safely rather than saying what they should and shouldn't do.

  • How do you feel about Sue's comment that she is compassionate with those who deserve it?

  • Bereavement is a complex area of compassionate care because individual responses and needs vary so much. Are there techniques from the previous weeks that you could use to help here? we would all want to be compassionate but how would we achieve that?

  • @MargaretT In that way it's the sharing of knowledge with others that gives them power.

  • Sounds lovely.

  • I suspect you're not alone with that.

  • I suppose it's about listening to other perspectives rather than doing what other people say.

  • There are so many good examples here. It realy does show that our experience of compassion can be quite subjective and individual.

  • Good to see we still have more people joining the course. Welcome. I hope you will share your ideas with your fellow learners.

  • Should a badge make a difference? If the obvious thing to do is introduce yourself and your role then that should happen anyway.

  • Do you think that's always the case or has it been your experience?

  • Is it just the layout? What is it about waiting rooms and reception areas that causes people to be silent, even when they know each other?

  • It's true that context is a factor in the extent to which we can use these tools.

  • These are all great contributions. Even reading some of them (Duran Duran!) is transporting me to another time and place.

  • There have been a few comments about dental practice and whether or not compassionate approaches are embedded. I wonder why dentistry has not traditionally focused on this.

  • We will see if we can get you the information in another way. Apologies. That's very frustrating.

  • Do you think perhaps we make assumptions that people are more willing to question professionals?

  • It's great to see that you found them helpful.

  • Do you think it is coincidence that there is congruence in the different frameworks that support practice.

  • Elaine Lee made a comment

    Thank you for all your contributions so far. There are lots of examples around friends and family. This makes me wonder about ways of ensuring the people are not denied access to the impotyant people in their lives when they need them most. In the past, healthcare in particular hasn't been good at that. Is it getting better?

  • This is lovely. I don't think this is all that different from the horse. Yes the horse itself was big but all that was required was for the staff to wheel a bed into a car park. Perhaps it's just about seeing what's possible and being open to that.

  • This is an interesting experience. Would you say that the compassion was in recognising this helped you, or the fact that the nurse recognised your autonomy?

  • Elaine Lee made a comment

    Welcome to those of you who are just getting started. Nice to see you and to see the range of backgrounds.

  • Interesting last point. I hope the workload level stays manageable and the environment remains happy.

  • Are you able to share the study name?

  • What about choice? What if they don't want to complete it or don't see it as useful? How do we meet their needs?

  • Could this be covered better by asking, how are you today? Is there anything I need to know?

  • Does this link back to the concept of the grand gesture?

  • I love that. What an inspired approach to communicating.

  • This is a very thoughtful post. Is it in your job that you're feeling the senses are being more fulfilled? What has changed?

  • And not being the only one who wants to change.

  • Why do you think that is? Could you lower your threshold for celebration or is it more complicated than that?

  • Might this approach support you to achieve this?

  • Would being more conscious or deliberate about it help increase consistency?

  • Why do you think that is?

  • @CFraser It's not so much the compassion but specific gaols that you might identify to achieve compassion such as introducing yourself to patients. You might set some SMART outcomes relating to that goal.

  • There are some really good contributions here. Thank you for engaging so well and keep up the good work. Great sharing of ideas and perspectives.

  • I don't think this is an extreme view. It's an expression of person-centredness isn't it?

  • So who looks after you?

  • Your example is very interesting. Small gestures are often without the need for resources, so how do we ensure that something bigger, that would benefit more people over a sustained period of time, period receive the investment required? Does compassion always have to be free or easy?

  • This sounds like a very instinctive approach to compassion.

  • This is a really good example of where it's the little things that are often the most impactful in showing compassion.

  • Good morning to everyone and welcome to the course. It's nice to see some introductions already. I'm looking forward to the next three weeks.

  • That last one is an interesting question. There must be some tatistics on general drinking habits fr the total population somewhere but I haven't found them. It is interesting that the general trend for younger people drinking less is also present in Scotland so perhaps the mental health picture in that regard will change over time.

  • Elaine Lee made a comment

    Some really good examples there. Thank you.

  • Thank you for sharing those Lauren

  • It's the result of having such small numbers of female prisoners but yes it will be hard for some families to visit.

  • I think that generally speaking I've been pleasantly surprised at how much impact the ban has had, particularly in bars and restaurants. I didn't expect adherence to be so good.

  • @CiaraRoss It's interesting how healthcare services are organised around chunks of chronological age as if a birthday suddenly changes the individual into someone else.

  • Some interesting thoughts. The question is really about whether being pregnant or being a mother puts women under too much scrutiny rather than men not being involved. If men were more involved (and it sounds like their not) I wonder if the balance of behavioral scrutiny would be better.

  • I'm glad you found the activity helpful. There is often more going on that is initially obvious.

  • Australia is interesting because not only do you have the issue of the variatn for First Nations people but you take remote and rural to a whole new level! We have large parts of Scotland that are uninhabitable but we're small. The issue of scale in Australia is fascinating in terms of health and social inequalities.

  • There is an impact issue in the fact that so much of Scotland's population lives in Glasgow and the surrounding area as well. Huge variation even in Greater Glasgow.

  • Some interesting comments here. The factors are definitely linked. Socioeconomic status certainly has an impact on environmental factors at an individual level (and at other levels). It's certainly a complex picture.

  • Welcome everyone. Good to see such an interesing range of backgrounds. I look forward to interesting discussions as the course progresses.

  • Elaine Lee made a comment

    Thank you very much for your positive comments. We have really enjoyed working with you all and are delighted you've found it to be a helpful course and a good learning experience. We look forward to seeing you on future courses and if you haven't completed the post-course survey, we would be very grateful if you could do that. We value the feedback (and use it!)

  • Interesting. Thank you. The letter was really just a structure using examples of the way people articulate their own experiences so that we weren't limiting expressions of compassion to the way we understand them.

  • It's really good to see everyone finding something useful in what we've looked at so far. There will be more next week for you to think about and apply.

  • You can always write something on the padlet board if the cards don't work.

  • Do you think that making people happy is the result of good leadership or its purpose?

  • Why creepy? That's an interesting perspective?

  • It is possible to download an 'unzipper' app if you need to use your ipad.

  • It's really great to see that you've all taken things away from this week's learning. The 7Cs have certainly made an impact. It always useful to have a practical tool or technique to use in your practice.

  • Do you have confidence that your feedback will be used to improve things?

  • That's a pity. They downoad as a zip file. What were you downloading them onto?

  • There are a lot of really good comments here, and lots of engagement with the senses framework concept. It makes for such interesting reading. Thank you and keep up the excellent work!

  • It is interesting that the modelling of poor behaviour often has more traction than modelling the good practice everyone starts with. I wonder why this is.

  • Music is a really important part of my life so I think this is a great activity. I've just been having a listen to some of your choices. Quite a varied range!

  • That's a very good point and cultural issues play an important part in how death is discussed or otherwise. You would have to think whether this would be useful or not in your context.

  • Just a reminder that the letter is not from a single person but is made up of the words and phrases that real people have used when articulating a positive experience of care. I think the need to thank others, even for something that should be taken for granted, is a natural response.

  • I agree that chalk might not help but talk does and modern education involves a lot of discussion these days (at least it does here). Getting students to talk about care and compassion can help them engage with the concepts, don't you think?

  • I do think that approach has changed. If nurses and others talk to patients that would be seen as a good thing. The issue quite often appears to be lack of time to do so.

  • In recent years in the UK the term client has been used more widely (in midwifery I prefer to call them women). The reason for this is not to imply a money relationship but to imply that the health service is just that: a service. It suggests a level of control and autonomy for the individual, or at least that's the aim.