Anna Triandafyllidou

Anna Triandafyllidou

Anna Triandafyllidou is Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration at Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.

Location Toronto, Canada

Activity

  • Good points Ruby thank you.

  • Canada has been doing a great job. at the same time Syrian refugees have also been very resilient and active in contributing to Canadian society.

  • @PatriciaD'Arcy indeed that would be important. It is not covered here - there was no space. but I agree with you.

  • @JazminT. yes we meant the only EU country.

  • There is a very interesting paper of about 10 years ago https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1111/imre.12048 which asks: When is migration voluntary? Migrants have agency and so have asylum seekers. at the same time some of us are 'freer' than others to decide on what to do with our lives and what opportunities to follow. And many times the accident of our...

  • A big thanks to all for sharing your experiences and backgrounds. and thanks to many for pointing out that migration is a normal part of human life. The way we understand migration has a lot to do with the nation-state order emerging in the last couple of centuries. It has not always been like that - there is nothing given or natural in the organisation of the...

  • Hi Jan. thank you for your comment and I am sorry if my answer comes with a long delay. The purpose of a massive open online course is to share some advanced knowledge but also to actually create new knowledge through peer interaction. i always feel I learn from these peer interactions with learners as well as the books and journal articles. I will try to be...

  • Realism... ok. but narratives (not necessarily grand narratives) have an important power in making real and tangible what seemed alien, strange or simply impossible. The question is what is a new narrative for Europe and the world that would resonate with people today.

  • Thank you all for sharing such incredible memories (both of a long time ago and those very recent!) that show the varieties, nuances, tensions and complexities of European identities and cultures...

  • I would like to clarify that the expression used is indeed wrong what we wanted to say is that this funding contributed to bringing cultural projects closer to the citizen - not that the citizens or Tunisia did not 'have' culture and this programme brought it to them but that this funding created opportunities for citizens to engage. we will correct the...

  • Indeed this is an open question for both sides. but I guess that they will worry first about trade and later about culture. While maybe they should prioritise culture?

  • Great points! thank you.

  • Thank you for your comments. Indeed culture can be as much uniting as dividing people. Perhaps we should better always speak of cultures in the plural. and we should also acknowledge how much we are all part of different (variations of) cultures and hence are not a carrier of a single culture. and that would already be an important step in cultural diplomacy...

  • Thank you. Very interesting examples of push and pull factors!

  • Perhaps what is needed is connecting more the policies of migration governance with the realities on the ground. I think many of you with your comments point precisely to this direction! thank you all for your engagement which makes this course special!

  • Dear Miriam this is not very precise with regard to Prato, Italy and other places: there is now in Prato both horizontal and vertical integration of the Chinese businesses. We perhaps have not been able to do justice to the issue in a short video. Having said this ethnic businesses do thrive partly thanks to their own communities and may employ co nationals....

  • it is a very controversial city and place.

  • That is a good question. Harald would have some views to share. http://cultures-interactive.de/en/ran-essay-en.html
    Perhaps we can address some of these issues in our next MOOC from the BRaVE project www.brave-h2020.eu where we speak about interfaith approaches and how to work from the ground up trying indeed to share a practitioner-led perspective.

  • Wayne hi. How is the genocide and ethnocide of the Uigurs related to civic education and preventing youth radicalisation?

  • There have been recent news on the PREVENT programme that are indeed pretty negative for building trust within society and particularly among minorities: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/oct/06/counter-terror-police-are-running-secret-prevent-database

  • Being radical is often (not always) a good thing. indeed climate change radicalism is a case in point. It helps re-position the debate. of course one can also be a radical nationalist or indeed racist... but on the whole radicalism has been positive for social change. Being violent though is, I believe, always negative.

  • Tariq Modood reflects on the difference and choice between nothing-to-do-with-me and not-in-my-name approaches in our soon to come GLOBAL EXTREMES blog with Open Democracy. I do not want to reveal here his arguments but it does raise questions about each individual's and each community's responsibility but also on how different communities being asked...

  • Thank you Amjad for this very important comment. We are about to start a blog on Global Extremes in cooperation with Open Democracy and one of the first issues that we will debate is how governments react to such terrorist events using New Zealand and the Christchurch attack as an example. So keep an eye on the GREASE http://grease.eui.eu and BRaVE...

  • Thank you for the very interesting examples. Of course resilience is a much broader concept that concerns our capacity to react to unexpected hardship, adapt and actually mobilise our many resources to change our condition. Michele Grossman though points to an important aspect of resilience in the fight against violent radicalisation and extremism: its...

  • Hi all. Very nice to e-meet you. We hope that you will find the course useful and we look forward to hearing your comments, reflections, and experiences. I see that there are some people with great work experience and academic expertise in the field - please do not hesitate to bring your input! For those that are new to the topic, please also do not be shy in...

  • @JenniferS There was little extra reading so that the course is manageable in your busy lives, but if you wish to find out more about our related work kindly visit: http://grease.eui.eu

  • Thank you. Comment noted about the fact that you felt we presented different religions as a little monolithic. With regard to violent radicalisation and Islamic fundamentalism and the ways to prevent and address it please check out our page in Futurelearn: https://www.futurelearn.com/partners/eui There is a course entitle: Religion, Radicalisation, Resilience ...

  • Thank you and noted. If you have some specifically problematic steps to highlight please do not hesitate to write to me and Tina directly at anna.triandafyllidou@eui.eu or tina.magazzini@eui.eu
    also please take into account that oftentimes we had to interview experts who were located at another continent!

  • Ensuring participation and representation of religious minority groups through effective institutional channels and have a discourse that clearly preaches respect for religious diversity and for each other is the main principle. Naturally the specific solutions adopted in specific communities will have to be adapted to local contexts with due sensitivity. No...

  • The law was voted on 21st December 2018 and became effective as of 1st January 2019. Apologies if this was not clear in the relevant article.

  • If you are interested to discuss PREVENT and related policy approaches aiming to counter religiously inspired radicalisation, keep an eye on our online courses - there is a new course starting on 16 September, it will open for enrollment in the next ten days: https://www.futurelearn.com/partners/eui

  • Indeed you are both right. It is a top down initiative but it is perhaps one step in the road of more not just recognition but also participation

  • In many European countries there are provisions for atheists, to be exempted from religion courses, for children to be taught philosophy... of course it is difficult to speak of formal representation unless atheists unite in an association themselves.

  • As you all rightly argue religion and freedom of religion are touchy issues and there seems to be no one size fit all model for governing religious diversity and guaranteeing the rights of both individuals and minorities. You might want to check this out: https://theconversation.com/europe-must-open-up-to-new-ideas-about-the-secular-state-65131 as to how...

  • The lecture is not outdated. It is actually brand new. but the lecture is not a journalistic account. It speaks of the constitutional and other mechanisms in place in India to accommodate religious diversity and ensure representation and recognition of minorities. Indeed the recent rise of Hindou nationalism and the current government's use of religion are...

  • Thank you for engaging so lively with the course. Indeed none of the models is perfect but you raise some important critical issues below about stability but also sustainability of the different regimes in the current socio political and economic context.

  • Apologies. Just saw the mistake. it must have been a glitch when we uploaded the transcript files. will correct asap!

  • indeed it is interesting that migration is part of society and most families have somebody who emigrated or immigrated, but it is still treated as a "crisis"

  • Indeed what you write is true. then the question is also why does migration attract such heated political debates. an issue to reflect upon in the coming steps/weeks.

  • Hi all, wonderful to e-meet you! we look forward to an exciting three weeks of learning!