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Online course

Getting Care Right for All Children: Implementing the UN Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children

Ensure that alternative care is a necessary, suitable and positive experience for children, with this free online course.

Free:

  • Access to the course for its length + 14 days, regardless of when you join (this includes access to articles, videos, peer review steps)
  • Access to quizzes and assignments
  • No certificate

Upgraded:

  • Unlimited access to the course, for as long as it exists on FutureLearn (this includes access to articles, videos, peer review steps)
  • Access to quizzes and assignments
  • A Certificate of Achievement when you complete the course

Find out more

Getting Care Right for All Children: Implementing the UN Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children

Why join the course?

It is difficult to determine the number of children in alternative care around the world, but we know that many children continue to be placed unnecessarily in the care system and in unsuitable, sometimes harmful, settings.

To address this, the United Nations General Assembly issued the Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children in 2009 based on two fundamental principles – ensuring both the necessity and the suitability of alternative care.

Taking the UN Guidelines as a framework, this free online course will help you gain insight into how the unnecessary placement of a child in alternative care can be prevented; how alternative care can constitute a suitable, positive experience for a child when it is necessary; and how children and young people who are leaving care can best be supported.

Explore the necessity and suitability of alternative care with the UN Guidelines

The course will begin with an introduction to alternative care and the UN Guidelines. Then, in Weeks 2 and 3, we will look at the necessity principle – how to support and strengthen families, identify high-risk children and use gatekeeping to prevent unnecessary entry into alternative care.

In Weeks 4 and 5, we will explore the suitability principle, including the need for a range of formal care settings from which to select the one best suited to each child, and what a sustainable deinstitutionalisation policy involves. In the final week we will consider how children can successfully leave care.

To bring your learning to life, each week of the course will include an episode of a specially-made film. This follows the experiences of a family with two children living in vulnerable circumstances as they move through an alternative care system.

Learn with alternative care specialists from CELCIS, UNICEF and the UN

The course has been developed by CELCIS in the University of Strathclyde in Scotland in partnership with a steering group established by the Geneva Working Group on Children without Parental Care. CELCIS has authored the widely-used guide Moving Forward: Implementing the ‘Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children’ and run the successful FutureLearn course Caring for Vulnerable Children.

During the course, you will hear from practitioners, carers, academics, children and young people, as well as having the opportunity to discuss experiences and ideas with thousands of other learners worldwide.

Skip to 0 minutes and 11 secondsAll around the world, for many different reasons, hundreds of thousands of children cannot live with their parents.

Skip to 0 minutes and 55 secondsWhat can we do to make sure we only provide the necessary and most suitable care when children really need it? The UN Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children sets out the principles for policy and practise that have been agreed upon worldwide. Join us to find out how we can put those guidelines into practise. Share your ideas, comments, and questions with practitioners, children and young people, and experts from around the world. Together let's make a difference.

When would you like to start?

  • Date to be announced

Who is the course for?

This course is designed for practitioners and policymakers from both state and non-state bodies (such as NGOs, CBOs and private service providers) and anyone working in providing services around children’s care.

This might include social workers, para-social workers, community support workers, lawyers, psychologists, child protection professionals, teachers, medical workers and care workers, including those in family-based and residential settings.

The course will also be accessible for people not working directly in this field and others with an interest or responsibility in the field of child protection and child care.

Who will you learn with?

Chrissie Gale

Chrissie has spent much of the last 22 years working on child protection programmes in different countries around the world. She leads on CELCIS’ international work which includes building partnership

Who developed the course?