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How to pay the bill

This video provides many examples of situational usages to explain how to ask the price and make payment in Chinese.
9.6
Li Hui: Oh, I’m so full. I love hotpot. I like spicy food.
15.3
Li Yameng: Wǒ yě shì. Lydia, Yígòng duōshao qián? I’ll pay with WeChat.
20.6
Li Hui: Yígòng 120 kuài. You just need to give me 60 kuài. Just now, Amy asked me “Yígòng duōshao qián”. It means how much is it in total. OK. Now let’s take a look at the pattern. Duōshao qián? Here, “duōshao” is used to ask about number. “qián” means “money”. “duōshao qián” means “how much is it”. Of course, we can also change “qián” into other nouns. For example, “Duōshao Zhōngguó rén”. It can be used for both countable and uncountable nouns.
61.7
Li Hui: Amy, I remember that we learned a sentence pattern “Nǐ jiā yǒu jǐ kǒu rén?” Right?
69.3
Li Yameng: Right.
70.2
Li Hui: And “jǐ “ is also used to ask about number, right?
73.8
Li Yameng: Right. But “jǐ” and “duōshao” are different. “jǐ” is only used for a countable noun and the small amount as well, usually under 10. That’s why there should always be a measure word after “jǐ”, like “jǐ gè, jǐ kǒu, jǐ bēi”.
97.2
But “duōshao” can be used for both countable nouns and uncountable nouns. The measure word can be omitted if the noun is a countable one after “duōshao”. For example, SISU yǒu duōshao liúxuéshēng? How many international students are there in SISU?
118.2
Li Hui: Now I will show you guys an example with my partner, Amy. Amy, zhè bēi chá duōshao qián?
123.9
Li Yameng: Zhè bēi chá 10 kuài.
127.3
Li Hui: Oh, it’s very cheap.
129.6
Li Yameng: Now let’s take a look of the expression “yígòng”. In the pattern “duōshao qián”, we may use “yígòng” before “duōshao qián” to ask how much is it altogether. When you go to a cashier to pay, you may ask “Yígòng duōshao qián”? But if you want to ask for the price of only one thing, not the total price, for example, the beef, we don’t use “yígòng”. Just say “Zhège duōshao qián”? Or to be more specific, “Zhège niúròu duōshao qián”?
170.1
Li Hui: Amy, you look good in this sweater. I like it very much.
174
Li Yameng: Thank you.
175.7
Li Hui: Nǐ de máoyī duōshao qián?
176.3
Li Yameng: Wǒ de máoyī 150 kuài.
181.6
Li Hui: Wow you earn it. Speaking of money, let’s learn something more about Chinese currency. Chinese currency is “rénmínbì”. “rénmín” means “people”. “bì” is for “money”. So “rénmínbì” literally means “people’s money”. “kuài” or “yuán” is the largest unit for Chinese currency, RMB. And “kuài” is more of spoken style. “máo” or “jiǎo” is the smallest unit for RMB now. And “máo” is used more often in speaking. 1 “yuán” or 1 “kuài” equals 10 “jiǎo” or 10 “máo”. Here are some more examples of prices in Chinese. Please repeat after me. 5 máo, 5 jiǎo, 1 kuài, 1 yuán, 5 kuài, 5 yuán, 10 kuài, 10 yuán, 20 kuài, 20 yuán, 50 kuài, 50 yuán, 100 kuài, 100 yuán.
265.1
Let’s see how to read this. 5 kuài 5 máo Here, “máo” can be omitted.
274.6
Li Yameng: Lydia, have you got the money for “huǒguō “ on your WeChat?
278.2
Li Hui: Wait, let me check. Yeah, I got it. I love WeChat Pay. It makes my life much more convenient than before. The digital wallets like Alipay or WeChat Pay are our favourite modern inventions.
293.9
Li Yameng: If you eat in a restaurant, you can use the digital wallet like Alipay or WeChat Pay in our phone.
302.4
Li Hui: Just now, we learned how to make payments. In Chinese, we say
306
Li Yameng: Duōshao qián?
307.5
Li Hui: If you want to ask how much it is in total, we say
312.2
li Yameng: Yígòng duōshao qián? Now you probably know how to make payments in Chinese.

This video provides many examples of situational usages to explain how to ask the price and make a payment in Chinese. In Chinese, we use the following pattern to ask the price.

audio

……多少钱? (duōshao qián?)

“多少(duōshao)” is used to ask about number. “钱(qián)” means “money”, “多少钱(duōshaoqián)” means “how much is it?”

If you want to know “How much is it in total?”, you can say “一共多少钱?(Yígòng duōshao qián?)” .

In order to answer the above question, you need to be familiar with the numbers in Chinese.

For example,

一共多少钱? (Yígòng duōshao qián?) 一共150块/元。 (Yígòng 150kuài/yuán.)

“块(kuài)” or “元(yuán)” is the largest unit for Chinese currency RMB, and “块(kuài)” is more of spoken style.

“毛(máo)” or “角(jiǎo)” is smaller unit , and “毛(máo)” is used more often in speaking. “1元(yuán)” or “1块(kuài)” equals “10 角(jiǎo)” or “10毛(máo)”.

If you want to ask for the price of just one thing and not the total price, we don’t use “一共(yígòng)”.

We just say “这个多少钱?(Zhège duōshao qián?)” or to be more specific, “这个牛肉多少钱?(Zhège niúròu duōshao qián?)”.

The different usage of “多少(duōshao)” and “几(jǐ)”

“多少(duōshao)” can be used for both countable nouns and uncountable nouns. The measure word can be omitted if the noun is a countable one after “多少(duōshao)”.

“几(jǐ)” is only used for a countable noun and a small amount as well, usually under 10.

There should always be a measure word after “几(jǐ)”, like “几个(jǐ gè)”, “几口(jǐ kǒu)”, “几杯(jǐ bēi)”.

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