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How to express health problems

At the beginning of this video, the instructor Lydia doesn't look very well and then, her partner, Amy, asks her a question.

At the beginning of this video, the instructor Lydia doesn’t look very well and then, her partner, Amy, asks her a question.

audio

  • 你怎么了? (nǐ zěnmele?) What’s the matter with you?

Here is a wordlist which can help you to answer the above question.

  • 困(kùn) sleepy
  • 饿(è) hungry
  • 病(bìng) sick
  • 累(lèi) tired
In order to answer the question, you can put the word between “我(wǒ)” and “了(le)”.
Here are some other words about illness.
  • 头疼(tóuténg) headache
  • 发烧(fāshāo) have a fever
  • 拉肚子(lādùzi) have diarrhea
In Chinese, the sentence pattern for general actions is as follows.
Subject + Time + 在 Location + Verb
我晚上在家学中文。 (Wǒ wǎnshang zài jiā xué Zhōngwén.)
I study Chinese at home tonight.
“在(zài)” means “at” or “in”,
such as
  • “在中国(zài Zhōngguó)”
  • ”在上海(zài Shànghǎi)”
  • “在学校(zài xuéxiào)”
  • “在家(zài jiā)”
Chinese is different from the sentence structure in English, because we always put the time or location before the verb.
For example,
  • “在上海学中文(zài Shànghǎ xué Zhōngwén)”
  • ”在家休息(zài jiā xiūxi)”

If the time and the location words both occur in a sentence, the time word is put before the location word.

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Learn Chinese: Introduction to Chinese Conversation

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FutureLearn - Learning For Life

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