Skip main navigation

Hurry, only 2 days left to get one year of Unlimited learning for £249.99 £174.99. New subscribers only. T&Cs apply

Find out more

Genomic sequencing – how do we get genomic sequences?

Genomic sequencing, applications, risk and misconceptions
Researcher in a lab looking at a bank of genome sequencing machines
© Wellcome Connecting Science

Genome sequencing technology is probably one of the fastest developing areas of science at the moment.

In less than two decades we have gone from being able to produce a single human genome in 13 years (costing billions) to being able to produce a fully comprehensive human genome sequence in a matter of days for less than $1000.

Some curriculums require students to understand the processes involved in DNA sequencing. There are a number of resources including articles, animations and paper based activities available to help you cover this in your teaching.

Below are some suggested resources to help introduce the “Sanger Sequencing” method and next generation sequencing (Sequencing by Synthesis)

1.DNA Sequencing animation. This 3D animation demonstrates how the Sanger sequencing method was used to sequence the first human genome. https://www.yourgenome.org/video/dna-sequencing

2.DNA to data activity A paper based activity where students match steps to images to understand the processes involved in sequencing the first human genome. https://www.yourgenome.org/sites/default/files/downloads/video/how-the-human-genome-was-sequenced/dnatodataworksheet.pdf

3.Sequencing at speed animation This 3D animation breaks down the steps involved in Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) or sequencing by synthesis. https://www.yourgenome.org/video/sequencing-at-speed

4.Life in the lab: the DNA pipeline This video shows how a sample progresses through a DNA sequencing pipeline at the Wellcome Sanger Institute. https://www.yourgenome.org/video/life-in-the-lab-working-in-a-dna-sequencing-pipeline

5.Sequencing: past, present and future This article summarises the key sequencing technologies developed and used over the last 40 years. https://www.yourgenome.org/facts/sequencing-technologies-past-present-and-future

Take a look at the resources, then in the comments box please tell us which of these would you use in your teaching and why?

As you go through this course, we recommend that you start a list of resources that may help explain genomics in teaching, and may provide inspiration for developing your own activity or lesson plan in week 3.

© Wellcome Connecting Science
This article is from the free online

Genomics for Educators

Created by
FutureLearn - Learning For Life

Reach your personal and professional goals

Unlock access to hundreds of expert online courses and degrees from top universities and educators to gain accredited qualifications and professional CV-building certificates.

Join over 18 million learners to launch, switch or build upon your career, all at your own pace, across a wide range of topic areas.

Start Learning now