Skip main navigation

ASEAN Nations’ Scores as per the Hofstede Model

Scores of six ASEAN nations are evaluated as per the Hofstede model
9.6
Here we include the scores of 6 ASEAN nations as per Hofstede model. 4 of the 6 nations belong to maritime southeast asia – that is, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines and Singapore and 2 belong to mainland southeast asia namely, Thailand and Vietnam. In Power distance Index across all the southeast Asian nations is high indicating power is distributed unequally and those in the low rung and high- rung accept their respective positions in society. Centralization of power exists, and subordinates are instructed what to do. Malaysia has remarkable score of 100 which indicates that people here completely accept hierarchical position in both office and society and these do not require any justification. Close on Malaysia’s heels in this dimension is Philippines.
71
Thailand displays least PDI score among the ASEAN nations that are featured here. In contrast to the Power Distance Index scores where ASEAN nations score high, in the individualism dimension they all score low. We see this across the nations, indicating a degree of societal interdependence and collectivism. As indicated, ASEAN nations display a neutral score (neither too high or too low) when it comes to Masculinity dimension indicating a less competitive society. However, this varies to a certain extent from country to country - Philippines displays the highest Masculinity score and Thailand the lowest.
132.9
The Power Distance Indices and the masculinity dimensions form a clear outward and inward circle in the radar graph indicating this as a common feature of ASEAN nations across the board. ASEAN nations score average on indulgence indicating a society where both restraint and indulgence are seen in certain proportion however, with a relatively high score of 57 Malaysia does indicate that the society is more willing to realize their impulses, a positive attitude and optimism towards enjoying life. For the 2 dimensions, that is Uncertainty Avoidance and Long-term orientation, Singapore stands apart from the rest of ASEAN nations. It scores a low of 8 on Uncertainty Avoidance and a high of 72 in Long-term orientation.
194.6
A low on Uncertainty Avoidance indicates that Singapore society accept uncertainty and risks and are ready to deal with them. This feature of Singaporeans makes them unique in the entire world. It may look surprising to a few since when you visit Singapore one sees a lot of rules and regulations which is characteristic of a high Uncertainty Avoidance nation. However, Singaporeans, consider abiding by these rules as just “fine”. Similarly, Singapore’s high Long-term orientation score indicates their desire to sacrifice short term gratification for a long-term and higher achievements. They also accept societal changes. A small city-nation, Singapore today is among the wealthiest nations in the ASEAN region, per capita wise.
257.3
Could we say that their national culture has helped them become what they are economically? Think over it.

The scores of 6 of the ASEAN nations (4 from maritime Southeast Asia: Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore; 2 from mainland Southeast Asia: Thailand, Vietnam) according to the Hofstede model are discussed here.

On Power Distance, all 6 nations scored high, indicating that power is distributed unequally and those at different levels of the hierarchy accept their respective positions in society.

table of power distance index

On Individualism, all 6 nations scored low.

The Power Distance and Masculinity dimensions form a clear outward and inward circle in the radar graph, indicating this as a common feature of ASEAN nations across the board. ASEAN nations scored average on Indulgence, indicating a society where both restraint and indulgence are observed; however, with a relatively high score of 57, Malaysia appears more permissive of people’s desires to enjoy life. On Uncertainty Avoidance and Long-term Orientation, Singapore stands apart from the rest of ASEAN nations, scoring low (8) on Uncertainty Avoidance and high (72) on Long-term Orientation.

This article is from the free online

Multiculturalism In ASEAN

Created by
FutureLearn - Learning For Life

Our purpose is to transform access to education.

We offer a diverse selection of courses from leading universities and cultural institutions from around the world. These are delivered one step at a time, and are accessible on mobile, tablet and desktop, so you can fit learning around your life.

We believe learning should be an enjoyable, social experience, so our courses offer the opportunity to discuss what you’re learning with others as you go, helping you make fresh discoveries and form new ideas.
You can unlock new opportunities with unlimited access to hundreds of online short courses for a year by subscribing to our Unlimited package. Build your knowledge with top universities and organisations.

Learn more about how FutureLearn is transforming access to education