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Discoveries and Accomplishments of the Early 21st Century

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In 2006, Fire and Mello were awarded Nobel Prize in medicine for the RNA interference work in animals …in animals. Although the Nobel Prize was not given for the RNA interference work in plant. In 2007, FDA concluded that genetically modified food product are safe including the animal meat. In 2008, as I mention earlier, these three people Chalfie, Shimomura, and Tsien won a Nobel Prize because the work on green fluorescence protein. They also use it as a reporter gene. In 2008, the same year, Craig Venter Institute created the largest man-made DNA which composed of close to six thousand …six hundred thousand base pairs.
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So synthetic life is not that far-fetched since people can or scientists can synthesize DNA with that many base pairs. Of course, that remaining is the medical ethics issue. Even now, animal, human cloning is prohibited. Or stem cell research which human embryos are prohibited under the Treaty of the WHO. Made in England in 2009, let me ask you is this a pig or a sheep?
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Actually, it’s a pig with curly hair. So that the pig would be able to roam around the farmland even in the wintertime because of the long curly hair. And you all know that pigs roaming around the farm produce better meat than those inclosed in the farm cages.

The series of biotechnological discoveries witnessed in the early 21st century point to an ever illuminating future for research scientists in the biomedical and agricultural frontiers

Recount of several important accomplishments in early 21st century:

  • 2006 – Andrew Z. Fire and Craig C. Mello awarded Nobel Prize in Medicine for RNAi work in animals
  • 2007 – FDA concluded that food and food products derived from transgenic animal safe
  • 2008 – Chalfie, Shimomura and Tsien awarded Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work on reporter gene expression
  • 2008 – J. Craig Venter Institute created largest man-made DNA structure
  • 2009 – First biogenetically engineered pig was produced in England
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Pharmacotherapy: Understanding Biotechnology Products

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