Skip main navigation

Rationale behind the WHO GVCR

text
This image shows a number of vector species contained within white circles, which are attached to a central circle shape with straight lines. The vector species you can see are mosquitoes, a flea, fly, louse, mite, sandfly, snail, tick & a triatomine bug.
© London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 2020

This article was brought to you by Dr Tessa Knox, Technical Officer (malaria and other vector-borne and parasitic diseases), World Health Organization.

The global vector control response (GVCR) document outlines a strategic approach to tackle vector-borne diseases and covers the period of 2017 to 2030.

The strategy was developed by three WHO departments – the Global Malaria Programme, Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, and Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, with the support of WHO regional offices. It was developed through broad consultation with countries, donors, researchers and areas of the private sector involved in vector control.

At the World Health Assembly in May 2017, Member States expressed strong support for the technical approach and adopted a dedicated resolution on the integrated approach for the control of vector-borne diseases. The global targets for the year 2030 of 75% reduction in mortality, 60% reduction in case incidence and prevention of epidemics due to vector-borne diseases were welcomed.

Essentially, the GVCR aims to reduce the burden and threat of vector-borne diseases through effective locally adapted sustainable vector control. Four pillars of action are identified, with two foundation elements of enhancing vector control capacity and capability and increasing basic and applied research and innovation (See Figure 1). Enabling factors of country leadership, advocacy, resource mobilization and partner coordination, along with regulatory, policy and normative support are highlighted. Key priority actions are outlined that will increase capacity, improve surveillance and better coordinate and integrate action across sectors and diseases.

Figure 1: A diagram outlining the response framework of the global vector control response 2017-2030. This diagram resembles the shape of a house. The foundations (A: Enhance vector control capacity and capability and B: Increase basic and applied research, and innovation) make up the bottom two structures of this. Above the foundations are 4 pillars of action (1. Strengthen inter- and intra-sectoral collaboration, 2. Engage and mobilize communities, 3. Enhance vector surveillance and monitoring and evaluation of interventions and 4. Scale up and integrate tools and approaches). At the top of this diagram is a statement in a triangular (or roof) shape ‘Effective locally adapted sustainable vector control’. Above this diagram is another statement ‘Reduce the burden and threat of vector-borne diseases that affect humans’. The enabling factors (country leadership, advocacy, resource mobilization, partner coordination, regulatory, policy and normative support) are listed down the side, in line with both the foundations and pillars of action.

Figure 1: The response framework of the global vector control response 2017-2030

Success will depend on the ability of countries to re-align and strengthen their vector control and surveillance programmes with necessary staff and financial resources. National strategic plans need to be revised and country-specific targets defined. National vector control needs assessments are a priority activity.

During this week of the MOOC, you will learn more about the GVCR and vector control needs assessments. As you work through, try to think about how the strategic changes proposed could be applied in your local context – or in a country context that you are familiar with.

The GVCR applies to all regions worldwide, spanning different eco-epidemiological settings and different development statuses (Figure 2). After all, 80% of the world’s population is at risk of one or more vector-borne diseases.

![Figure 2: A diagram of the overlapping global distribution of nine major vector-borne diseases for which integration of vector control programmes may be beneficial, 2016. Reflects all locations where the population is at risk of at least one of the following: malaria, lymphatic filariasis, dengue, leishmaniasis, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis or onchocerciasis. Colours indicate the number of vector-borne diseases that pose a risk at each 5×5 km grid cell. The highest number of overlapping diseases are seen across Central & South America, Africa, South-East Asia and the Pacific Islands.]

Figure 2: Overlapping global distribution of nine major vector-borne diseases for which integration of vector control programmes may be beneficial, 2016. Reflects all locations where the population is at risk of at least one of the following: malaria, lymphatic filariasis, dengue, leishmaniasis, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis or onchocerciasis. Colours indicate the number of vector-borne diseases that pose a risk at each 5 × 5 km grid cell.

Coordinated action to implement the game-changing approach outlined in the Global vector control response document will be critical to protect vulnerable populations throughout the world from this risk.

© London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 2020
This article is from the free online

The Global Challenge of Vector Borne Diseases and How to Control Them

Created by
FutureLearn - Learning For Life

Our purpose is to transform access to education.

We offer a diverse selection of courses from leading universities and cultural institutions from around the world. These are delivered one step at a time, and are accessible on mobile, tablet and desktop, so you can fit learning around your life.

We believe learning should be an enjoyable, social experience, so our courses offer the opportunity to discuss what you’re learning with others as you go, helping you make fresh discoveries and form new ideas.
You can unlock new opportunities with unlimited access to hundreds of online short courses for a year by subscribing to our Unlimited package. Build your knowledge with top universities and organisations.

Learn more about how FutureLearn is transforming access to education