Yakubu Salifu

Yakubu Salifu

Yakubu is a nurse and educator in adult health, palliative care, and health policy, with research interests in patients, caregivers and health care professionals managing end-of-life conditions.

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  • Thanks for the suggestion. This is the third time we are running this, and others have learned about the PACE steps. But of course, we can still advertise.

  • @verawasher It worked for me as well. Maybe you can try again and let us know. You might want to check the internet connection of the browser (I used Chrome). Thanks

  • This article (open access) about care home in te contest of Covid may be useful: Towers, A. M., Killett, A., Handley, M., Almack, K., Backhouse, T., Diane, B., ... & Goodman, C. (2020). Producing ‘Top Tips’ for care home staff during the COVID-19 pandemic in England: rapid reviews inform evidence-based practice but reveal major gaps. Journal of Long-Term Care.

  • Is the use of a numerical pain rating scale applicable in your context? What do you use?

  • Great exposition from you. As you said, pain control is key in palliative care. However, access to pain medication and how patients and the caregivers (especially in a resource-limited context) assess the outcomes could be problematic due to several reasons. You may want to read about h family caregivers become the ‘doctors’ of men with prostate cancer at...

  • Thanks for the feedback. What was particularly useful to you?

  • Will be interesting to know how it unfolds. Happy to get feedback on that

  • What is the implication of these in your own setting?

  • I do agree with you as most countries, especially the resource-limited context, do not have a policy direction on palliative care. You may want to read this short article https://theconversation.com/ghana-needs-a-better-policy-to-guide-care-for-cancer-patients-132042

  • Thanks, what are your thoughts about the implications of these?

  • SUMMARY FOR WEEK ONE:
    Thank you for your active participation this first week. We apologise for a few of the links that were not working; this was because of server hacking hosted by the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC). We have since rectified some of these.

    We have learned about palliative care in care and nursing homes, especially for...

  • Great. There has bee a repeated call for the integration of Palliative care into national health systems. The latest is a multinational study showing a clear need for palliative care integration. https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/news/palliative-care-needs-better-integration-with-health-care-systems-for-this-and-future-pandemics

  • @JOHNNIXON please use these
    https://endoflifecare.be/en/pace-steps-to-success

    The English version of the PACE Steps on the EAPC website under archived projects:
    https://www.eapcnet.eu/eu-funded-palliative-care-research/

  • Great! I hope you would be able to network with other professionals

  • Hello Hannah, I particularly liked your phrase 'giving the best end of life care that is possible.' I think that is one key principle of palliative care. However, due to resource constraints (especially in resource-limited context), lack of trained personnel, among others, some patients do not get the opportunity to have such care to ensure BEST END OF LIFE....

  • Hello everyone,
    Welcome to the online course for Improving Palliative Care in Care Homes for Older People.
    My name is Dr Yakubu Salifu, an Educator on this course together with Professor Sheila Payne. Bader Rimawi, a mentor, will also respond to your queries as soon as possible.
    I hope that by the end of this 3 weeks course, you have a new appreciation of...

  • Thank you all; great team and very useful information

  • This COVID 19 course is not only useful but timely and professionally delivered. It would certainly make positive impacts in our lives; and personally I have shared some of these videos with others to stay safe as well educate.

  • I dont think we learned a lot from the Ebola outbreak. And as Professor Peter Piot reflects, we need to let COVID 19 serve as a guide and useful lessons for any future pandemic or epidemic.

  • I dont think we learned a lot from the Ebola outbreak. And as Professor Peter Piot reflects, we need to let COVID 19 serve as a guide and useful lessons for any future pandemic or epidemic.

  • @AnnaSeale I do agree that several factors need to guide the distribution of the vaccines, which will always not be adequate for the entire world, realistically. FACTORS such as vulnerability, key workers (nurses, doctors, police, etc. who by nature of their work to society, put them at increased risk), the financial ability of governments, etc. all need to be...

  • I do agree that several factors need to guide the distribution of the vaccines, which will always not be adequate for the entire world, realistically. FACTORS such as vulnerability, key workers (nurses, doctors, police, etc. who by nature of their work to society, put them at increased risk), the financial ability of governments, etc. all need to be taken into...

  • I think a trial needs to be done quick to curb this disturbing trend

  • Both in law and clinical practice, you need evidence to make a logical conclusion (conviction and treatment, respectively). In law, a person is innocent until proven guilty, but in clinical practice and infectious disease management specifically, all persons are 'potentially infectious' until proven otherwise.

    Until these pieces of evidence are established,...

  • I do agree that as individuals we can do a lot, to minimise the spread of covid 19. Thanks for the information

  • In most places globally CCTV is no applicable, all that we need is a sense of team work, use of common sense, and being sincere to help trace people who have made contacts with confirmed cases. I have a piece on it here
    https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/.
    My main worry is countries with...

  • @DesmondNutt In most places globally CCTV is no applicable, all that we need is a sense of team work, use of common sense, and being sincere to help trace people who have made contacts with confirmed cases. I have a piece on it here
    https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/.
    My main worry is...

  • In most places globally CCTV is no applicable, all that we need is a sense of team work, use of common sense, and being sincere to help trace people who have made contacts with confirmed cases. I have a piece on it here
    https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/.
    My main worry is countries with...

  • @JudyMBScN,Canada I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • @Dr.MohammadKabirHussain I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • @Dr.ZoricaNikleski I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • @NwakaegoStephanieEde I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • @ChristopherMerrifield I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • @AnnaSeale I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • @SandraSpruce I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • I do think China did made unprecedented interventions to reduce the outbreak early and timely. KUDOS! I have given my opinion about how countries, governments and the public can help curb Covid 19 in the Nursing Times. https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • @AnnaSeale I suppose this is what governments and authorities need to have in mind. The shock of covid 19, the losses, deaths, and the rapid changes that people have to make to the usual lifestyles are all areas of concern as far as psychological domain is...

  • I suppose this is what governments and authorities need to have in mind. The shock of covid 19, the losses, deaths, and the rapid changes that people have to make to the usual lifestyles are all areas of concern as far as psychological domain is concern.

  • I agree and some basic principles to follow. You can read a piece that was published by Nursing Times https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • @JosieGallo Risk communications and engagement very essential as you alluded to. Again, panic-buying and price hikes do don help the situation at all but rather put a lot people increased risk due to lack of basic necessities and avoidable stress. I have a published work by the Nursing Times on how we need to involve the public and how to mitigate the COVID...

  • Risk communications and engagement very essential as you alluded to. Again, panic-buying and price hikes do don help the situation at all but rather put a lot people increased risk due to lack of basic necessities and avoidable stress. I have a published work by the Nursing Times on how we need to involve the public and how to mitigate the COVID 19 ...

  • @StevenMacWhinnie Risk communications and engagement very essential as you alluded to. Again, panic-buying and price hikes do don help the situation at all but rather put a lot people increased risk due to lack of basic necessities and avoidable stress. I have a published work by the Nursing Times on how we need to involve the public and how to mitigate the...

  • @BrianHunt Risk communications and engagement very essential as you alluded to. Again, panic-buying and price hikes do don help the situation at all but rather put a lot people increased risk due to lack of basic necessities and avoidable stress. I have a published work by the Nursing Times on how we need to involve the public and how to mitigate the COVID 19...

  • @SandraB Risk communications and engagement very essential as you alluded to. Again, panic-buying and price hikes do don help the situation at all but rather put a lot people increased risk due to lack of basic necessities and avoidable stress. I have a published work by the Nursing Times on how we need to involve the public and how to mitigate the COVID 19 ...

  • Risk communications and engagement very essential as you alluded to. Again, panic-buying and price hikes do don help the situation at all but rather put a lot people increased risk due to lack of basic necessities and avoidable stress. I have a published work by the Nursing Times on how we need to involve the public and how to mitigate the COVID 19 ...

  • @RachelWei Hello, I have detailed some of these things and was published by the Nursing Times
    https://www.nursingtimes.net/opinion/covid-19-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going-from-here-19-03-2020/

  • @JudithGlynn Fantastic explanation

  • @SamanthaMcHale . If a test has a high sensitivity, it denotes it has almost a prefect means of detecting all the COVID 19 cases. In other words, there is less likelihood to miss a positive case. On the other hand, since the sensitivity is low, it could also give a false positive results; and to me this is still better than missing a positive patient if the...

  • @BenedictGannon . If a test has a high sensitivity, it denotes it has almost a prefect means of detecting all the COVID 19 cases. In other words, there is less likelihood to miss a positive case. On the other hand, since the sensitivity is low, it could also give a false positive results; and to me this is still better than missing a positive patient if the...

  • @JudithGlynn EThis is my opinion. If a test has a high sensitivity, it denotes it has almost a prefect means of detecting all the COVID 19 cases. In other words, there is less likelihood to miss a positive case. On the other hand, since the sensitivity is low, it could also give a false positive results; and to me this is still better than missing a positive...

  • @RichardDennehy . If a test has a high sensitivity, it denotes it has almost a prefect means of detecting all the COVID 19 cases. In other words, there is less likelihood to miss a positive case. On the other hand, since the sensitivity is low, it could also give a false positive results; and to me this is still better than missing a positive patient if the...

  • Excellent question @AnnaSeale . If a test has a high sensitivity, it denotes it has almost a prefect means of detecting all the COVID 19 cases. In other words, there is less likelihood to miss a positive case. On the other hand, since the sensitivity is low, it could also give a false positive results; and to me this is still better than missing a positive...

  • @Dr.TosanOmaghomi I agree with you , there is lack of facilities for cases in most developing countries. This is about Ghana but may be relevant https://theconversation.com/ghana-needs-a-better-policy-to-guide-care-for-cancer-patients-132042

  • @PaulC, I do agree with you @AnnaSeale the main issue is that mots resource -poor countries are not prepared either logistically or in mind for the covid 19. There are issues of lack of adequate healthcare facilities or lack of national guideline or both. You may want to check these two information on the link...

  • This is very informative piece about the chronology of events, and the lapses in preparedness and myths (so to say) that some countries, and even now, still hold on to.