Lisa de Kleyn

Lisa de Kleyn

Academic researching environmental ethics, governance and diverse connections, with nature. Twitter: @lisadekleyn; www.linkedin.com/in/lisadekleyn/; https://cur.org.au/people/lisa-de-kleyn/.

Location Melbourne, Australia

Activity

  • Hi Annette, I feel these tensions. Every product or service has embodied resources, energy and human activity. This makes me question - Does my consumption make me complicit in the environmental and human impacts that have occurred as a result of the production of the product or service? What standard of living should we all adopt given the increasing global...

  • I think that the person who you have described is ethical, and potentially fits the definitions of the common, private and public citizen. Ethics is about caring, caring is applied, and it will have unique expressions based on our situation, context and abilities. Our lives change, and we will express our ethics differently, at different stages.

  • Hi Harshita, Feeling that you can't get involved in your city because you are a student, suggests that there is something wrong with the way that the city undertakes engagement. The needs of a student are as important as anyone else's needs.

  • I agree Farah, and also think a universal basic income could shift some dysfunctional behaviour from dire circumstances into more stable behaviour and a more cohesive society.

  • Brilliant. Thanks for the references!

  • That's great. That's the goal. I'll look up the talk.

  • The establishment of goals, targets and even universal principles are always done at a time, with the knowledge at hand, in contexts, with power relations. It's important to acknowledge this. Thanks for your example.

  • Does he account for the need for green space and adequate services too?

  • That must be overwhelming to hear about Gabrielle.

  • In a previous post someone made a reference to Thatcher having made a significant and enduring negative impact on England. It is concerning that individuals can have such a strong influence. Sound process with explicit ethical principles are so important at mediating such individual influences.

  • Thanks Trish, I agree and one of my favourite aspects of this course is hearing about everyone's experiences and perspectives from around the world and using them to reflect on my own ethical frameworks and whether they stand the test of these different contexts.

  • Hi Jane, these are great insights into the inconsistencies between what are considered minor discretions, that become part of a culture, compared to those that are judged as unjust and why.

  • Hi Ameya, that's a troubling situation and requires constant work to achieve justice.

  • It's incredible how an election can instate someone who has such a significant and long lasting impact. In Australia, we've watched successive Liberal governments systematically undo equitable and sustainable policies and programs.

  • Great insight Gabrielle. We discuss the universal basic income in week 4, step 13. It will be great to hear what you think of the discussion.

  • Thanks Jenny! That's great to hear. I hope it gave you insights into the City of Yarra and principles that you can apply in your engagement with the city.

  • Smart and articulate insight Jef!

  • Welcome to week 5 everyone! It's your final week. You've done an incredible job working through the last 4 weeks and it will be great to continue our discussions in relation to citizen engagement.

  • Great! I look forward to discussing your perspectives.

  • I have the same impression with CSR. It's an add on, which means it's easy to cut. CSR needs to be embedded in all aspects of a business to change a culture. I've noticed that CSR often sits separately in a Public Relations department. One company I worked with kept moving the environment department from Accounts, to Operations, to Public Relations. I thought...

  • I agree that the bureaucracy want stability, and this also refers to policy stability and long-term planning. The bureaucracy also wants to be trusted, which doesn't always occur with a change of government.

  • Hi Jef. It is illuminating to read about people's experiences of corruption around the world. I find that it's also a good test of the ethical frameworks that I align with, and how robust they are in different contexts and situations. I'm glad you enjoyed the week.

  • Fantastic Harshita. It's great to see children represented.

  • I agree that the 'real economy' is fake. With environmental and human rights external to the market, costs are not being accounted for and prices are meaningless and ultimately harmful.

  • Signing on to principles and making pubic commitments is a good behaviour change tactic.

  • Victoria is similar and committed to 25% by 2020 and 40% by 2025.

  • The article says that the city's announcement follows Norway’s national government announcement of being climate neutral from 2030 by buying international carbon credits. Olso is likely to be incorporating offsets as well.

  • Hi Harshita, is there anything like Nightingale in your city?

  • Hi Denise, I agree with your comments about Melbourne!

  • Hopefully the need to rely on volunteers will reduce. As we know with technology, it takes time to develop to a point when it's ready for the market, able to be produced at scale and there's demand and importantly, a regulatory framework to support investor certainty. This is even more difficult when competing with established technology, such as coal, which...

  • It's such a significant problem, that low socio-economic groups not only have to deal with the struggles of their situation, they also have limited opportunities for culture, recreation and wellbeing.

  • Thanks Zareen. Waste management and water have been top priorities in Victoria too, particularly during the drought. Victoria had an effective program encouraging Victorian's to limit their water use to 155 litres per day.

  • When you were in the Labour Party, how were decisions made? Was there a focus on the processes being fair, or were outcomes determined and their achievement considered more important?

  • It sounds like the place where you live in your city is safe and well connected and there's sharp segregation of disadvantaged communities. I've heard mention of Melbourne being redesigned for walking and enjoying the city. The current gridlines are designed to keep people moving fast and efficiently between spending and working.

  • I agree Si. Wealth inequality and also lack of power are problems for stability.

  • The focus on private renting of small properties is a problem in cities where profit is the primary motive and developers are left to take the lead. I'm glad that you have affordable housing near the facilities that you need including your workplace.

  • Hi Annette, it's fantastic that Dortmund has a plan that focusses on disadvantaged areas. So often these areas don't receive the attention they need as the power within them lack power.

  • That sounds like a good plan Lydia.

  • Hi Annette, I hope that many of our leaders started with the intention of supporting the greater good. Unfortunately the political system we've created appears to be focussed on perpetuating power, and power is based on resources and numbers. I think many leaders make many trade-offs that they convince themselves are for the greater good, but end up being...

  • I completely agree.

  • Hi Nicole, I agree with you. There are so many aspects of life that need to change to support human and environmental rights and flourishing. We can't do everything, and I would argue that there isn't one problem or action in particular that will 'save the world'. I think the best way to look after ourselves and the world we live in, is to choose the issues...

  • Hi Gilbert, the entrenchment of corruption can be devastating and fighting against it debilitating, however I agree that it's important to have discussions, try different models, celebrate successes, learn from the losses, work with others and keep moving towards ethics as best as we can.

  • That's a fantastic example Gabrielle. I'm particularly impressed by the collaboration between the Netherlands and Germany. Humans have created artificial boundaries, which affect our responses to environmental issues, but of course, the environment doesn't recognise our boundaries. We need a larger scale response to human and environmental health for many...

  • That's a positive story Jane! Making people accountable for their actions is critical in encouraging and maintaining ethical behaviour. We all make mistakes but ethical behaviour needs to become part of the culture and accountability sets us on that path.

  • I wonder how decision-makers deal with cognitive dissonance in these instances. Whether they believe that economic development really is the way to prosperity for all (in which case they wouldn't feel cognitive dissonance); feel a responsibility to another person/organisation/group as justification for their actions; feel that they are making a trade-off for...

  • Hi Telford, that's correct. The environmental justice frame seeks recognition justice - broad recognition of who is a stakeholder in an issue; procedural justice - accessible decision-making processes where participation is meaningful and influential; and distributive justice - such that the outcomes are fairly distributed in society. I think this is a...

  • Hi Jane, the first part of your post sounds idyllic and I love the focus on the environment. It sounds like the environment is a part of the identity of the city.

  • Hi Richard, have you watched Joe Hurley's video in step 4.4? Joe talks about affordability as well as access to opportunity, quality and sustainability. I think expanding beyond the idea of affordability is critical to ethics and housing.

  • That's an awful story Severin. Unfortunately governments have been known to look away until a crisis occurs, busying themselves with other seemingly more urgent, and politically expedient matters.

  • That's really disappointing Gabrielle. It's positive that the media is reporting cases. That's a start.

  • Thanks Zerreen. That sounds distressing.

  • That's an interesting question. It points to Brexit and the US election. What result has democracy brought?

  • I'm committed to a strong process, with ethical principles set for the goals, rather than articulating specific, and hoping that can bring just processes and outcomes.

  • Hi Henry, that's what the research finds too. Apparently if the process is considered to be fair, people are more likely to accept the outcome, even if the outcome is not favourable to them. However, it people think the process is unfair, they are less likely to accept the outcome, even if it favours them.

  • I'm glad you brought up age, as I think that an ethical city accounts for all ages. Young people are usually transported through cities, accompanied, and have confined, designated spaces. Older people as you say, are pushed further out for affordable housing and potentially further away from their community and services. Cities are made for people who are...

  • Thanks for the explanation Ares. Has the mix of parties been strongly Liberal National for successive terms, or is this a recent change?

  • Hi Zarreen, has the focus on environmental sustainability been effective in Cape Town?

  • Hi Socha, that's right. A bureaucrat recently said to me that community-led policy creates policy that sticks. It was a great insight.

  • Hi Denise, that's fair enough. Statements alone don't create change. Statements need to be made, understood, accepted, implemented, measured and revitalised by people, and this needs to be supported by the institutions that we create.

  • Hi Socha, that's a great point about understanding the transitions that cities and people are going through to be prepared to support people through times when they are most vulnerable.

  • You're right. Zero sustainability and entrenching disadvantage.

  • Thanks for sharing the article.

  • Hi Nerkis, have there been any successful challenges to the cartel? I agree that political stability facilitates the chances of achieving equity and flourishing. Even with the stability that we have in Melbourne, we still have marginalised communities fighting for a voice in a system that excludes them. The difficulty in your city must feel impenetrable.