Sam Hellmuth

Sam Hellmuth

I am a Professor of Linguistics at the University of York. I teach phonetics and phonology, and my research explores variation in intonation patterns across English dialects (among other things!).

Location UK

Activity

  • Hi @HollyJadeFleming - sorry I missed your question about this practical issue. You can use your MOOC participation without paying to take the quizzes; information is here: https://www.york.ac.uk/language/undergraduate/offers/

  • Thanks @RaquelReis !

  • Thanks for these suggestions @ZainabYounes - we're really glad the course has been useful. Good luck with our ongoing studies!

  • Thanks @LucyFrear !!

  • PS @Margaretstewart We would love to use your comment to promote the course in future (e.g. on our website or on social media) and as part of our evidence that the course has been effective (e.g. in reports and talks). We won't use your name, only the text of your comment. May we have your permission to do this? Thanks, Sam

  • PS @AshleighGrant
    We would love to use your comment to promote the course in future (e.g. on our website or on social media) and as part of our evidence that the course has been useful (e.g. in reports and talks about course use). We won't use your name, only the text of your comment. May we have your permission to do this? Thanks, Sam

  • Hi @AshleighGrant - that's good to hear. We're glad the course has been useful for your studies as well as 'in real life'. It will be great if you can follow up with us next year!

  • Hi @LauraBunnett - we're glad it has been useful! Good luck with your ongoing and future studies.

  • Hi @Margaretstewart - thanks for this thoughtful comment. There is a lot of hidden bias that we can be unaware of - we're glad that the course is making a contribution to bringing this into the open, in the area of language at least.

  • Thanks @RichardY - we're really glad it has been useful. Good luck with your studies!

  • Hi @RaquelReis, thanks for your comment on our course!

    We would love to use your comment to promote the course in future (e.g. on our website or on social media) and as part of our evidence that the course has been useful (e.g. in reports and talks about course use). We won't use your name, only the text of your comment.

    May we have your permission to...

  • Hi @TamaraRudenko, thanks again for your comment on our course!

    We would love to use your comment to promote the course in future (e.g. on our website or on social media) and as part of our evidence that the course has been useful (e.g. in reports and talks about course use). We won't use your name, only the text of your comment.

    May we have your...

  • Hi @EmilyWainwright, thanks again for your comment on our course!

    We would love to use your comment to promote the course in future (e.g. on our website or on social media) and as part of our evidence that the course has been useful (e.g. in reports and talks about course use). We won't use your name, only the text of your comment.

    May we have your...

  • Hi @HollyC, thanks again for your comment on our course!

    We would love to use your comment to promote the course in future (e.g. on our website or on social media) and as part of our evidence that the course has been useful (e.g. in reports and talks about course use). We won't use your name, only the text of your comment.

    May we have your permission...

  • Hi @HarryHolman, thanks again for your comment on our course!

    We would love to use your comment to promote the course in future (e.g. on our website or on social media) and as part of our evidence that the course has been useful (e.g. in reports and talks about course use). We won't use your name, only the text of your comment.

    May we have your...

  • Hi @LucyFrear, thanks again for your comment on our course!

    We would love to use your comment to promote the course in future (e.g. on our website or on social media) and as part of our evidence that the course has been useful (e.g. in reports and talks about course use). We won't use your name, only the text of your comment.

    May we have your...

  • Hi @EmmaFowler, thanks for your comment on our course!

    We would love to use your comment to promote the course in future (e.g. on our website or on social media) and as part of our evidence that the course has been useful (e.g. in reports and talks about course use). We won't use your name, only the text of your comment.

    May we have your permission to...

  • Hi @VerityIrvine thanks for that suggestion. We'll pull together a bibliography and add to the course for next time. If you'd like a copy in the meantime drop us an email on englishlanguagetoolkit@york.ac.uk.

  • Hi @AngelaBrown that's really good to hear. If we can follow up on anything please do get in touch! You can reach us on englishlanguagetoolkit@york.ac.uk. We'd love to hear how you use the case studies etc in future.

  • Thanks for your thoughtful comments @SandraAtkinson - we've really appreciated the quality (and liveliness!) of debate and discussion among course participants. Thanks for your contribution to that!

  • Hi @HollyC - fantastic! We hoped that the course would indeed inspired more folks to think of studying linguistics. Get in touch with us at englishlanguagetoolkit@york.ac.uk if you have any specific questions we can help with.

  • Thanks for this suggestion @JosianeBoutonnet - we've had such a positive response that we're definitely planning to run the course again in future, and we'll review what worked best and what can be improved!

  • Hi @HarryHolman - we're glad you want to study language more in future! Mission accomplished :)

  • Hi @LucyFrear - it's great to hear how much you've enjoyed the course. Yes please do get in touch with us and we'll be glad to answer any specific questions you have. A good email address to use would be englishlanguagetoolkit@york.ac.uk and we can then forward it to the tutor who can best answer your particular question! We're also all very easy to find on...

  • Good spot @AljawharahIbrahimAlzamil and @TamaraRudenko - this was a typo, and I've corrected it now in the table!

  • Yes thanks @WilliamDoyle and @ShuliB for this discussion. That 'Speak American' poster is a great example of language attitudes. It relates also to language policy. I think we as linguists would argue that one reason it is important to be able to objectively measure and articulate language attitudes is to ensure that language policy isn't based solely on...

  • Thanks for this link @JimHill!

  • These are great points @LeilaW - there will always be lexical innovation (new words) as language is constantly changing!

  • Spot on @GillianWatson - it's all about perception, and categorisation. You'll hear in week 2 about methods sociolinguists use to measure these perceptions and categorisations, to see how much they are shared within a speech community.

  • Great point @HollyC - yes it's about connotations (or 'associations' as we'll see next week) - and they vary from person to person.

  • Great example @AnnieSchwartz - we'll be looking at exactly this example of different variants of 't' in week 2, so stay tuned!

  • Hi @ClareCarr - yes, that's on the right track, as you'll see in the next steps. Sociolinguists are interested in the associations between accents and attitudes, and between accents and identity.

  • We'll learn about accommodation - which is the technical term for "purposefully (if unwittingly) aligning their accents" - in week 3; and in week 2 we'll see some of the methods we use in sociolinguistics to try to measure both 'witting' and 'unwitting' variation. Do stay tuned for the whole course!!

  • Great point @shaziaGulzar - our relationship with the person we're talking to can influence how we speak. @clairechilds has a great paper on this https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378216618304624

  • Hi Benjamin - welcome to the course! We hope it gives you lots of food for thought to reflect on in your UCAS personal statement!

  • @HoiYatPun good point! Yes, education and other factors such size of social network, or degree of mobility, can be important predictors of variation (as well as things like age, gender and social class). Next week we'll see that we have to take the language structure into account as well when we measure variation!

  • Welcome Richard, we hope you enjoy the course.

  • Hi Laura, welcome - and let us know if your students have any questions!

  • How you enjoy the course Dawn!