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Ottawa Charter in the 21st century

Health promotion is a diverse area of practice directed at individuals, communities and whole populations.
© Coventry University. CC BY-NC 4.0

Health promotion is a diverse area of practice directed at individuals, communities and whole populations.

The WHO has played a key role in influencing a broad health-promoting agenda that goes way beyond the healthcare sector.

Held in partnership with the Canadian Government and the Public Health Association of Canada, the Ottawa Charter (1986) is seen as the formal foundation of health promotion and the birth of a visionary shift in thinking internationally, nationally and locally about health, policy and action to enable people to achieve better health and wellbeing.

If you would like to learn more about the charter, we encourage you to read Potvin and Jones (2011) ‘Twenty-five Years After the Ottawa Charter’ which we link to in the See also section below.

In the next step we ask you take part in a Peer Graded Assignment to review your understanding of the charter and its relevance today.
© Coventry University. CC BY-NC 4.0
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Public Health and Nursing: Drive Public Health Promotion

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