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How do you write a good presentation introduction?

The concepts that will be discussed in the speech need to be outlined in the introduction, discussed, then summarised in the conclusion.
© Deakin University English Language Institute (DUELI) 2021

Once you have understood the basic structure of a presentation, now need to know how to plan a powerful introduction. Here, we’ll take you through how to do exactly that.

Remember that when planning your introduction, you will need:

  • An interesting hook.
  • To introduce the topic.
  • An outline introducing the key ideas that will be covered in the main presentation.

Body Ideas

The concepts that will be discussed in the body need to be outlined in the introduction, discussed in detail in the body and summarised in the conclusion. As an example, if developing ideas for a body presentation on the sport of soccer, topics could include:

  • Rules of the sport.
  • How to train for the sport.
  • Your own experience playing the sport.
  • Sponsorship and reward for famous players.
  • Travel opportunities if you compete in soccer competitions.

Example Introductions

The following are examples of spoken introductions.

Example 1: The sport of triathlon.

Triathlon

Good afternoon everyone. Most of you learnt how to run or ride a bike when you were young. However, put your hand up if you can swim? Now, keep your hand up if you can do all three? Today, I want to talk to you about triathlons, which is the sport I would like to represent my country in at the Olympics. My presentation has two parts: first, I’ll tell you about the rules of the sport, and secondly I will talk about the benefits of being able to travel with this sport. So let’s begin…
The hook used was a question to the audience, there are two main ideas introduced, and the topic is introduced.
Example 2: The sport of running
9.63 seconds was the time it took the fastest man on earth to run 100 metres and set an Olympic record at the London Olympics in 2012. His name is Usain Bolt. Does anyone know which country he is from? Yes, he is from Jamaica. Good afternoon everyone. Today, I want to talk to you about running, which is the sport I would like to represent my country in at the Olympics. My presentation has two parts. First, I’ll tell you about my background in running, and secondly I will talk about the best athletes in this sport. So let’s begin…
In this example, two hooks are used: a fact and a question to the audience. The topic of running is introduced and the main ideas that will be presented in the body are outlined.
NOTE: When writing, it is important not to write out every word, making the presentation seem as if it is just being read, instead of engaging with the audience. The focus should be on looking at the people (maintaining eye contact), using hands to explain and use natural language patterns. To help you to NOT read, only use bullet points, write only the keywords that will help you know what to say in your speaking presentation.
© Deakin University English Language Institute (DUELI) 2021
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