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Summary of Week 2

Summary of the week's learning and key issues in the field of reproductive health from Nisso Nurova.
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NISSO NUROVA: We’ve now come to the end of Week 2. We’ve learned that there are around 90 million unintended pregnancies around the world each year, and that meeting the unmet need for contraception could reduce this number approximately by three quarters. Access to and use of modern contraception has increased worldwide from the 1970s to today, but more work still needs to be done. There are more than 200 million women who have an unmet need for contraception. And even those women who do have access to services experience multiple barriers that often lead to discontinuation or interruption of protection. But there are successes. Developments in long-lasting methods mean that more women remain protected for longer.
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And developments in countries like Ethiopia have been encouraging. We hope that you enjoyed the discussion on the situation there. Reproductive health has been a cross-cutting issue on this course, given its impact on health across the lifecycle. Next week, we’re going to return to our life cycle structure, and focus on current issues in maternal health. We look forward to seeing you then.

We have now reached the end of Week 2. We have learned that there are an estimated 90 million unintended pregnancies around the world each year, and that meeting unmet need for modern contraception has the potential to reduce this number by three-quarters.

Access to and use of modern methods of contraception has increased worldwide from the 1970s to today although more work still needs to be done, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. More than 200 million women continue to have unmet need for contraception, and many women who are using contraception experience multiple barriers when trying to access services, often leading to discontinuation or interruption of protection. However, there are success stories. Developments in long-lasting methods help women stay protected for longer, and rapid progress is being made in some countries, such as Ethiopia. We hope you enjoyed the discussion on the situation there.

With its impact on health outcomes across the lifecycle, reproductive health has been a cross cutting subject for learning on this course. In Week 3 we will return to the lifecycle structure, focusing on current issues in maternal health. We look forward to seeing you then.

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