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Health and well-being

Several of the individuals from Palace Green had experienced poor health during childhood and this was marked out on their bones and teeth. Enamel hypoplasia (with arrows) in the lower …

Sex and age estimation

Age at death and the sex of skeletons both have to be estimated if a demographic profile is to be created of the population under study. These results can only …

When human remains are found

In this video we see the human remains from Palace Green being excavated. Afterwards they were brought back to the laboratory for further examination. The painstaking work of analysis, undertaken …

Earlier claims and discoveries

One local tradition in Durham tells that Scottish soldiers who were taken prisoner at the Battle of Dunbar in Scotland in 1650 were buried under a mound on the west …

Who found the mass graves?

The discovery of the two mass graves in 2013 was made by Janet Beveridge, a project archaeologist with Archaeological Services, part of the Department of Archaeology at Durham University. Here …

Where was it found?

The large open space of Palace Green was once occupied by houses. It was probably the market place of the early settlement of Durham. All this was swept away by …

What was found?

Most of the excavation at the Palace Green site was quite shallow, but deeper excavation was required where the steps for a fire exit descended. This is where the human …

Why were we excavating?

In the autumn of 2013, building work was about to begin on the construction of a new café at Palace Green Library in the heart of the historic city of …

Discovery!

That sense of discovery, the excitement at seeing something revealed for the first time, is very much part of what it is to be an archaeologist. A fingerprint on a …

Introduction to the team

TEAM LEADERS: Andrew Millard is Associate Professor of Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology at Durham University. Andrew coordinated the scientific analysis for the Scottish Soldiers Project, conducted the isotope …