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The deep ocean in our everyday lives

Just as we have been affecting the deep ocean environment (as you saw in the video ‘Out of Sight, Out of Mind?’), so the deep ocean has a variety of …

Out of sight, out of mind?

Rubbish and litter strewn along beaches is unfortunately a common sight. The litter poll in the previous step is based on data from the Ocean Conservancy 2018 Cleanup Report. In …

Life at sea

Ocean scientists involved in the course give insights about what they miss and what they love about life at sea. What do you think you would miss the most? What …

Calculating residence time

In this video, Rachel and Will give a more practical demonstration of residence time. As was explained in the video ‘Where does the salt come from?’, the concept of an …

Where does the salt go?

So now that you have considered the vast quantities of salt that are present in the ocean, let’s get back to why that is. As you saw in previous videos, …

How much salt is there in the ocean?

In the previous step Where does the salt come from? Will Homoky explained that rivers contain only a tiny fraction of salt compared to the waters of the ocean. Before …

Where does the salt come from?

In this step, Dr Will Homoky (University of Leeds) talks about the process of chemical weathering and the transport of water by rivers into the ocean. But rivers contain just …

Why is the sea salty?

Professor Rachel Mills explains why water is such a powerful solvent* and how this contributes to making our oceans salty. Over the next few steps we will explore the question …

Describing new species: a tale of two shrimps

In the previous video, Verity described how we preserve deep-sea specimens during research expeditions to analyse later ashore. If they turn out to belong to a previously unknown species, biologists …

A warmer ocean: coral bleaching

We learned in the previous week that the symbiosis of corals with photosynthetic microalgae is vital for the formation of warm water reefs in the shallows. Unfortunately, the relationship between …

The open ocean: a world on the move

As land-living animals, we are used to seeing habitats shaped and defined by fixed geographic features like hills, valleys, lakes and rivers. We also recognise changing seasons by looking at …

What animals live there?

Most people can recognise the large ice dwelling polar bears and penguins, but many marine biologists are far more interested what lives under the ice and at the seafloor. Here, …