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Offline media

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According to the Office of National Statistics, there are still over five million adults in the UK who do not use or have access to the internet. This is significant, particularly if you are trying to reach the most vulnerable members of society. You’ll need to think creatively to get your key messages across to this offline audience.

However, you may also be surprised by how well offline marketing can cut through for younger audiences who are bombarded by digital advertising. For example, data from Royal Mail shows that people between 18-24 receive the least amount of direct mail but are most likely to interact with it. While businesses are frantically trying to target customers online, offline can sometimes offer a less competitive channel.

Offline media still plays a big part in the marketing mix and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Television, radio, newspapers, flyers/brochures, door drops, direct mail are all very powerful tools for marketers. Successful marketers will blend their online content with offline methods, to create the most effective campaigns.

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Introduction to Marketing: Omnichannel Marketing and Analysis

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