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Skip to 0 minutes and 0 secondsThere are two broad mechanisms by which we can acquire immunity to infections. Passive immunity involves the transfer of preformed antibodies from an immune individual to a non immune one. This may occur naturally, for example, the transfer of antibodies across the placenta from a mother to her baby, or artificially for example, the administration of human immunoglobulin to non-immune pregnant women who have been in contact with chickenpox. In both cases, the protection afforded is temporary. Active immunity, as the name suggests, require an individual's immune system to be actively involved in generating the immune response and so the protection provided is generally more long-lasting, as immunological memory is induced.

Skip to 0 minutes and 50 secondsAgain, active immunity can be acquired naturally, by surviving an infection with a particular organism, or artificially, through the use of vaccines. And there we have it - two broad mechanisms for acquiring immunity to infections.

Active and passive immunity

There are two broad mechanisms by which we can acquire immunity to infections, actively and passively.

Passive immunity involves the transfer of pre-formed antibodies from an immune individual to a non-immune one.

This may occur naturally, for example the transfer of antibodies across the placenta from a mother to her baby, or artificially, for example the administration of human immunoglobulin to a non-immune pregnant woman who has been in contact with chickenpox.

In both cases the protection afforded is temporary.

Active immunity, as the name suggests, requires an individual’s immune system to be actively involved in generating the immune response and so the protection provided is generally more long lasting as immunological memory is induced.

Again, active immunity can be acquired naturally, by surviving an infection with a particular organism, or artificially, through the use of vaccines.

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This video is from the free online course:

Using Infection Control to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance

UEA (University of East Anglia)

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