Want to keep learning?

This content is taken from the Keio University's online course, Understanding Quantum Computers. Join the course to learn more.

Today's Quantum Computers

What are the capabilities of today’s systems, and how far will we get in the near future? Noisy, Intermediate-Scale Quantum (NISQ) systems are building on today’s technology.

Defining a “Winning” Quantum Computer

The term quantum supremacy has been used to describe demonstration of a quantum computer that can solve problems that a classical computer can’t. Some people are concerned about the impression that “supremacy” gives, but the term seems to have caught on.

An obvious question to ask is, “What’s the smallest useful quantum computer?” Of course, to answer the question, we must have both a machine and a problem to solve. The earliest algorithm to capture widespread attention was Shor’s factoring algorithm, but we now know that executing it requires a lot of high-fidelity qubits, so that’s not it. Many researchers now believe that the first application to demonstrate quantum supremacy will be in quantum chemistry, machine learning, optimization problems, or certain physics problems that are difficult to solve.

It is worth asking the question in the opposite direction: simulating the behavior of a quantum computer using a classical computer is hard. What’s the largest quantum computer we can simulate? We have talked about the exponential growth in the size of our state vector with the number of qubits. This can serve as a rough guide to what is possible:

number of qubits memory needed reading
\(10\) \(16\times 2^{10} \approx 16\times 10^{3}\) 16 kilobytes
\(20\) \(16\times 2^{20} \approx 17\times 10^{6}\) 16 megabytes
\(30\) \(16\times 2^{30} \approx 17\times 10^{9}\) 16 gigabytes
\(40\) \(16\times 2^{40} \approx 18\times 10^{12}\) 16 terabytes
\(50\) \(16\times 2^{50} \approx 18\times 10^{15}\) 16 petabytes
\(60\) \(16\times 2^{60} \approx 18\times 10^{18}\) 16 exabytes

(If this looks familiar, it should remind you of the table we saw back in Step 2.07.)

From this kind of table, and experience with large-scale quantum simulations, researchers reasoned that classical computers would struggle to simulate quantum computers larger than fifty qubits.
Therefore, a quantum computer of fifty qubits or more should be able to do things that a classical computer can’t.

Moreover, recent advances in simulation techniques have allowed researchers at IBM to fully simulate 49 qubits for limited types of circuits (algorithms), and to partially simulate 56 qubits with similar restrictions. The best a classical computer, then, is still a moving target, though we believe that real quantum computers will exceed this size soon.

NISQ and Today’s Bleeding-Edge Machines

Unfortunately, it’s not quite that simple. We have discussed the need for quantum error correction (QEC), but existing quantum devices are far too noisy to use QEC effectively. (Soon we will get into the details of QEC.) This leaves researchers with the question of how to best utilize noisy quantum computers. Professor John Preskill of Caltech coined the term noisy, intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) to describe the era we are entering: with tens to low hundreds of qubits available in devices that can perform tens to hundreds of gates before noise completely destroys the state, what can we accomplish? Preskill lays out the argument beautifully, and we encourage you to read his paper.

As of March 2018, the following machines (in no particular order), which we might call the first-generation NISQ machines, are known:

  • IBM has three quantum computers with 5, 5, and 16 qubits accessible via the web and publicly available, and a 20-qubit device available to members of the IBM Q Network. (Keio University hosts the only hub in Asia, and provides access to our students and researchers from companies that are members of the hub.) A 50-qubit device, as of this writing, is under experimental testing, with no publicly announced results. All of these are transmon (superconducting) systems.
  • Google published results on a 9-qubit transmon chip, and is now testing a 72-qubit transmon chip named Bristlecone.
  • Intel, working with the Technical University of Delft, has created a 17-qubit transmon chip (under testing in Delft as of October 2017) and a 49-qubit transmon chip (announced in January 2018).
  • Rigetti released data on their chip with 19 transmon qubits (December 2017).
  • The research group of Misha Lukin (Harvard) has published a paper describing experiments with 51 atoms using cold, trapped atoms (similar to but somewhat different from ion traps), and
  • the research group of Chris Monroe (Maryland) published, in the same issue of Nature, a paper on a 53-qubit ion trap experiment. Both of these experiments demonstrated behavior that is difficult to model classically, and so sit right on the edge of representing quantum supremacy.

We realize that this description is little more than a list, and that it is incomplete and will be out of date quickly, but it seemed important to give learners a sense of the dynamic nature of the race toward useful, desirable quantum computers.




今日の量子コンピュータ

今日の、近い将来の量子コンピューターの能力はどのくらいでしょうか?NISQ(ノイズを含む中規模なビット数の量子)システムは、今日の技術に基づいて構築されています。

「勝つ」量子コンピュータの定義

量子超越性という用語は、従来型のコンピュータでは不可能な問題を解決できる量子コンピュータのデモンストレーションを記述するために使用されています。”超越性”が与える印象を懸念している人々もいますが、この言葉は人気があるようです。

よくある疑問は「最も小さな有用な量子コンピュータは何ですか?」です。もちろん、疑問に答えるためには、解決すべき機械と問題の両方を持っていなければなりません。広範囲の注目を集める最も初期のアルゴリズムはShorの因数分解アルゴリズムでしたが、実行するには忠実度の高い量子ビットが必要であることがわかっています。多くの研究者は、量子超越性を示す最初のアプリケーションは、量子化学、機械学習、最適化問題、または解決することが困難な特定の物理問題にあると考えています。

逆の質問も価値があります。従来型のコンピュータを使って量子コンピュータの動作をシミュレートするのは難しいです。私たちがシミュレートできる最大の量子コンピュータは何ですか?私たちは、量子ビットの数を用いた状態ベクトルの大きさの指数関数的な増加について話しました。これは可能なことの大まかなガイドとして役立ちます:

量子ビット数 必要メモリ reading
\(10\) \(16\times 2^{10} \approx 16\times 10^{3}\) 16 kilobytes
\(20\) \(16\times 2^{20} \approx 17\times 10^{6}\) 16 megabytes
\(30\) \(16\times 2^{30} \approx 17\times 10^{9}\) 16 gigabytes
\(40\) \(16\times 2^{40} \approx 18\times 10^{12}\) 16 terabytes
\(50\) \(16\times 2^{50} \approx 18\times 10^{15}\) 16 petabytes
\(60\) \(16\times 2^{60} \approx 18\times 10^{18}\) 16 exabytes

(2.07で同じようなテーブルを見ることができます。)

このようなテーブルと大規模な量子シミュレーションの経験から、従来型のコンピュータは50量子ビット以上の量子コンピュータをシミュレートするのに苦労するだろうと研究者は推論しました。

さらに、近年のシミュレーション技術の進歩により、IBMの研究者たちは限られたタイプの回路(アルゴリズム)で49量子ビットを完全にシミュレートし、同様の制約で56量子ビットを部分的にシミュレーションすることができました。従来型のコンピュータも進化を続けていますが、量子コンピュータはすぐにシミュレーションできるサイズを超えると信じています。

NISQと今日の最先端のコンピュータ

残念ながら、それほど単純ではありません。我々は量子誤り訂正(QEC)の必要性について議論してきたが、既存の量子デバイスはQECを効果的に使用するにはあまりにもノイズが多いです。(すぐにQECの詳細に入ります。) この現状は、ノイズの多い量子コンピュータをいかに最適に利用するかという課題を研究者に残しています。カリフォルニア工科大学のJohn Preskill教授は、私たちが突入した”ノイズが完全に状態を破壊する前に数十から数百のゲートを実行することができる”時代を記述するために、NISQ(ノイズを含む中規模なビット数の量子システム)という用語を作り出しました。Preskillの議論は美しく行われており、彼の論文を読むことをお勧めします。

2018年3月現在、第1世代のNISQマシンと呼ばれる次のマシン(順不同)が知られています。

  • IBMには、Web経由でアクセス可能な5、5、16量子ビットの3台の量子コンピュータと、IBM Qネットワークに公開されている20量子ビットのデバイスが利用可能です(慶應義塾大学はアジアで唯一のハブを主催し、ハブのメンバーである企業の研究者や学生がアクセスできるようにしています)。本稿の執筆時点で、50量子ビットのデバイスは実験的なテスト中です。 これらはすべて、transmon(超伝導)システムです。
  • Googleは9量子ビットのtransmonチップの結果を公開し、現在はBristleconeという72量子ビットのtransmonチップをテスト中です。
  • インテルは、デルフト工科大学と協力して、17量子ビットのtransmonチップ(2017年10月現在のデルフトでテスト中)と49量子ビットのtransmonチップ(2018年1月に発表)を作成しました。
  • Rigettiは、19量子ビットのtransmonチップのデータを公開しました。(2017年12月)
  • The research group of Misha Lukin (Harvard) has published a paper describing experiments with 51 atoms using cold, trapped atoms (similar to but somewhat different from ion traps)
  • Chris Monroe(Maryland)の研究グループがNatureの同じ号で、53キュビットのイオントラップ実験に関する論文を発表した。 これらの実験の両方は、古典的にモデル化するのが困難な挙動を示し、したがって、量子の優位性を代表する一例です。

私達はこれらの説明のリストが不完全なものであり、すぐに時代遅れのものとなると考えていますが、有用で望ましい量子コンピュータへの競争の激しさの感覚を学習者に与えることは重要と考え記載しました。

Share this article:

This article is from the free online course:

Understanding Quantum Computers

Keio University