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Using deep neural networks and biological subwords to detect protein S-sulfenylation sites

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Please read the paper as an example of how to produce a bioinformatics paper.

Protein S-sulfenylation is one kind of crucial post-translational modification (PTMs) in which the hydroxyl group covalently binds to the thiol of cysteine. Some recent studies have shown that this modification plays an important role in signaling transduction, transcriptional regulation, and apoptosis. Identifying S-sulfenylation sites, therefore, could be the key to decipher its mysterious structures and functions, which are important in cell biology and diseases. Thus, this study develops an in silico model for detecting S-sulfenylation sites only from protein sequence information.

In this study, protein sequences served as natural language sentences comprising biological subwords. The deep neural network was consequently employed to perform classification. The results suggested that the proposed method (fastSulf-DNN) achieved excellent performance in predicting S-sulfenylation sites compared to other well-known tools on a benchmark dataset.

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Artificial Intelligence in Bioinformatics

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