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Secondary maths example (teacher-created)
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Secondary maths example (teacher-created)

In this video example, a teacher demonstrates the maths technique of 'counting on'.
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My problem is 6,834, subtract 1,249. I will be using a pictorial method for this and I will be using a counting-on method. I’m going to use my number line because the gap between my numbers is large. First I’ll draw out my number line and place the smaller number at the start and the greater number, at the end.
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Then, I’m going to start by adding 1, this will take me to my next ten. Next, I will add 50, this will enable me to reach my next hundred. Then, I’ll mentally calculate, using my knowledge of number bonds. I know that 3 and 7 makes 10, so 300 and 700 will take me to my next thousand. Now I’m at 2,000, I’m able to make a big jump for 4,000, which will get me to 6,000. from here, I will add my 834 and this has enabled me to reach 6,834. Next, I will use my column method, to add my jumps and find my answer.
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Finally, I will use the inverse to check, to make sure I’m correct.
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My answer is 5,585.

All of the previous examples of work have been student-created to a brief set by the teacher. The next three examples of work feature teacher-created films used to demonstrate a concept, such as the simple one-shot film above which demonstrates the maths technique of ‘counting on’.

This type of content is often used on a VLE (virtual learning environment) for flipped learning, where students learn a technique at home and then practise it in school. During the recent school closures, short films like this became a powerful tool for pupils – and their parents – to learn, rehearse and embed new strategies. They also became another opportunity to connect with pupils – by recording short catch-up greetings or filming teachers reading the next chapter of the class novel.

Recording these instructional films – as opposed to delivering them in real time in the classroom or online – means they could form part of a ‘library of learning’ on the school’s website and be viewed multiple times by those who require extra support. It would also allow pupils with inconsistent access to the internet to feel included in online learning opportunities if films are downloadable to watch offline.

What other ideas do you have for using teacher-created films as a tool for learning?

Add your thoughts to the Comments below.

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Filmmaking and Animation Online and in the Classroom

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