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Ask Mark – Week 2 responses

Prof Mark Solms responds to students' questions about Subjectivity - one of the properties of the mind, part of the What is a mind? course.
© University of Cape Town CC-BY-NC

Ask Mark responses

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Thank you to everyone who posted questions last week. I have recorded a response to four of the many interesting questions you posed in Step 2.13 of Week 2. As I was travelling, I have recorded audio responses this week:

Question 1: Why not define “mind” as something that you have (like a brain) instead of something that you are?

Question 2: Please expand on what subjectivity means – this week we have for example looked at colours, at computers trying to be human – carpets cannot do these, yet have subjectivity? There is my subjective experience of a carpet, but I can’t see the carpet itself exhibiting its own subjectivity. If we can only know our own minds, how can we recognize the “subjective aspect” of another entity?
Question 3: I am interested in the relationship of subjectivity and objectivity. I have heard that psychoanalysis is the theory that is able to combine both. What are a few important concepts and what would research look like in this field?
Question 4: What is your understanding of the term empathy in neuropsychoanalytic terms? How is it measured?

Please post your questions for Week 3: Consciousness in Step 3.10

© University of Cape Town CC-BY-NC
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What is a Mind?

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