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Where are viruses found?

Now that we know what viruses can infect, we can analyse where they might be distributed. Have your say Have you ever thought about having non-harmful viruses in your body? …

What are viruses?

Viruses are subcellular infectious agents, i.e., smaller and simpler than cells. Most of them – at least those that affect animals – are only visible with the electron microscope, since their size …

Summary of the week

Both retrovirus and herpesvirus establish life-long diseases which are very difficult to eliminate from the body. The mechanism of the chronic disease is different in both cases. While herpesviruses remain …

Immunodeficiency and other diseases

Retroviruses infect vertebrates, from fish to mammals. Many of the diseases may go unnoticed because they develop slowly. Some others may be fulminant and lead to death in a few …

How many herpesviruses have been discovered?

Would you have imagined that herpesviruses could infect oysters? Have your say Do you know if there are vaccines for some of the notifiable herpesvirus infections which affect chickens (eg. …

Herpesvirus vs. Retrovirus

Although retrovirus and herpesvirus determine chronic and persistent infections, the mechanisms are different. Have your say Do you have cold sores? Reflect on when they come back. Look for the …

The unique retrovirus

The video names several retroviruses which produce important diseases in animals. The replication process determines why retroviruses induce slow progressive diseases. Sometimes they are so long and progressive that the …

What is a herpesvirus?

This video shows you how to recognise the key features that define the herpesviruses. It also outlines the different steps they follow for replicating and producing many more viral particles. …

Introduction to Week 6

Chronic diseases are a real problem, especially if there are no clinical signs and the animal is left undiagnosed. It may spread the virus to other animals, and when we …

Summary of the week

This week we have learned about viruses which have a clear airborne transmission. There are many examples of these types of viruses, some very virulent and which may even produce …

Immunity and vaccines

Immunity to influenza virus infections, as in the case of any other viral infections, has two essential components that act in a sequential and coordinated way. The first line of …

How is the epidemiological surveillance done?

In 2005 a global network was created involving different countries and international organizations, such as the FAO, OIE, WHO, etc., called “OFFLU” Influenza Office. Its function is to assist in …

Diagnosis of influenza

As we know, influenza viruses are able to infect multiple species. Therefore, the diagnosis of infection in any animal species is based on: Clinical suspicion of the disease Sampling of …

Equine influenza

The protection induced by vaccines against horse influenza doesn’t last long. For this reason, the surveillance of the disease requires horses to be revaccinated frequently. Have your say Please, share …

Swine influenza

Swine play a very important role as reservoirs for the diversity and pandemic threats of influenza A viruses. In the context of the prevention and control of swine flu it …