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Skip to 0 minutes and 10 seconds In this week, we are discussing bias and human rights. And we begin our lectures by discussing the types of bias, and starting with the machine learning lifestyle lifecycle. And how bias can begin to enter the inter-algorithms in the machine learning life cycle. And this is during the data collection process, data preparation process, model development process, model evaluation, and deployment. So we’ll set up this week by discussing the types of bias in the machine learning life cycle. Then we will discuss this idea of attempting to explain artificial intelligence. So if we have is lawyers the obligation to be competent in technology, and at the same time these algorithms are not open, how do we fulfill our competency requirements?

Skip to 1 minute and 12 seconds If, algorithms are closed? So one attempt would be this idea of data set disclosure forms and model disclosure forms. Then we’ll move into bias in the criminal justice system. And in week one we briefly touched upon a case State v. Loomis, and we’ll discuss that a little bit more in this week as well with regard to bias. And I introduced the 2nd of my two favorite quotes. The first being “Technology is neither good nor bad. Nor is it neutral.” This is a similar quote. And it says that “Justice must not only be done, but also must be seen to be done.” In this is the idea that the judicial system can’t be behind closed doors.

Skip to 2 minutes and 5 seconds So what does this mean in the context of artificial intelligence, machine learning and technology. Then we’ll move to the second major topic. In this is the topic of AI and human rights. So we’ll focus on this human rights section on four broad abstract topics. In the criminal justice system, in the financial system, the healthcare system, and the human resources contacts. And we’ll talk about whether or not A.I. is good for those items, bad for those items, or neutral, we’re not sure. Then I’ll talk about human rights law, by introducing the ICCPR and the ICESCR, by introducing the ICCPR and the ICESCR, the Civil Political Rights and Economic Social and Cultural Rights. And discuss article by article what’s in A.I.

Skip to 2 minutes and 58 seconds is implementing these human rights instruments. Then I’ll finish up with this idea of A.I. and ethics. And going back to this idea of transparency. That is, lawyers have the obligation of technical competency to understand an algorithm is closed. Should we require that it be open so we can understand it. And then the question continues to be if we as lawyers have are looking at a technology tool that’s open, do we know what’s going on And then the idea of is if a machine learning scientist know what is going on. So in this week we’ll be introducing bias and human rights issues. It’s been a pleasure so far in learning with you.

Skip to 3 minutes and 54 seconds As always if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to email me. Again there may be thousands of students taking this course, so bear with me if I’m late in responding to you. Again, thanks everybody, Take care and good luck with week 2.

Week 2 introduction

In week one we briefly touched upon a case State v. Loomis, and we’ll discuss that a little bit more in this week as well with regard to bias.

In this week, we are going to discuss bias and human rights. We’ll begin our lectures by discussing the types of bias, and starting with the machine learning life cycle. And then focus on the human rights section on four broad abstract topics.

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This video is from the free online course:

AI for Legal Professionals (I): Law and Policy

National Chiao Tung University