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Skip to 0 minutes and 9 seconds Congratulations everybody on finishing the course So week 4, this week we discussed A.I. in Judiciary, and A.I. and the practice of law. We talk broadly about this idea of predictive systems predictive information, predictive models. And how we’re constantly gathering information from the world about us, about our communities, to forecast our actions. And in the criminal justice since we could even be predicting whether or not we will commit a crime. In the ethical implications about using this kind of artificial intelligence technology by a judge. Or, a judge allowing such technologies to be used in his or her courtroom. And then discussing some ideas about the courtroom of tomorrow.

Skip to 1 minute and 3 seconds And lawyering going forward in the face of this emerging artists artificial intelligence emerging technology. So in this week, there’s one thing I’d like you to remember, It’s this idea of what I called the integral theory, integral model, integral thinking. There’s certain applications in the world utilizing this, but my idea is I think it’s necessary for the world of artificial intelligence. In that, there are multiple stakeholders now, there are scientists involved, psychologist involved, sociologist involved. They’re all these disciplines that are now involved in the legal process. So that being able to appreciate this, To appreciate all these difference discipline, It’s right to attempt to create a map going forward. That combines observations from all of these different fields.

Skip to 2 minutes and 5 seconds So we can we can have a broader appreciation of the whole. And as we evolved, as human consciousness evolved, as artificial intelligence evolved, and we begin to learn about ourselves more and more, and confronting ourselves, and society. Using a more integral approach, I think design thinking approach where we’re considering the user more, considering the human element more. So again congratulations for Completed the course, there is one final exam left. But don’t worry it’s there to make sure that I know you’ve done the reading and listen to the lectures. So again, I hope we can keep in touch in the future. If you need anyting, please feel free to reach out to me by email.

Skip to 2 minutes and 58 seconds And forgive me if I’m not prompt in replying to your email It’s not because it doesn’t mean. It’s not meaningful for me It’s because I may have a lot of emails from this course. Again thank you everybody for allowing me to be your facilitator. It was an honor to learn with you throughout this course. And as always, take care.

Summary of week 4

Congratulations on finishing the course!

This week we discussed A.I. in Judiciary, and A.I. and the practice of law. We talked broadly about this idea of predictive systems predictive information, predictive models, and how we’re constantly gathering information from the world about us, about our communities, to forecast our actions. And then we also discussed some ideas about the courtroom of tomorrow.

There’s one thing we’d like you to remember, it’s the idea of what I called the integral theory, integral model, integral thinking. There’s certain applications in the world utilizing this, but my idea is I think it’s necessary for the world of artificial intelligence.

Thank you very much for joining this course. The course will be followed by a second course, AI for Legal Professionals (II): Tools for Lawyers planned for February 2021. If you’re interested, welcome to enroll on it.

Hope we can keep in touch in the future. See you!

(Attached is the citation of the week.)

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AI for Legal Professionals (I): Law and Policy

National Chiao Tung University