Skip to 0 minutes and 10 secondsSecond, finals. Finals are behind the initials. They should be pronounced with more power than initials. Here, I'll show you six simple finals in pinyin. "a" "o" "e" "i" "u" "ü".

Skip to 0 minutes and 35 secondsa, open your mouth wide and relax your tongue naturally. "a" "a" "a" Now that we've learned tones and initials, we can combine them with the final "a" to form a syllable. For example-- "bà pá." "b à-- bà" "pá p á--pá." We pronounce the initial "b" lightly and quickly move on to the final "a." And the final should be pronounced fully and loudly.

Skip to 1 minute and 15 secondsGeorge, would you like to try? Yes. "bà pá." Quite easy, isn't it? Yeah, it is. Soon, there will be more syllables for you to practice. Now let's just go back to the finals.

Skip to 1 minute and 34 seconds"o." Round your lips and open it a little bit. Move your tongue back slightly. "o" "o" "o" "mò" "fó".

Skip to 1 minute and 53 secondsNext, "e." It's similar to "ir" in British English, bird. But don't widen your mouth that much. You can move your mouth a little bit like this. "e" "e" "e" We've mentioned in the first video that not all in initials and finals can be put together. Here "e" cannot be put with "b, p, m, f." But final itself can be one syllable. For example, "é" "è", "è" means hungry. "wǒ è le" I'm hungry. "nǐ è le ma" Are you hungry?

Skip to 2 minutes and 44 seconds"i" Open your mouth wider and keep your teeth aligned. "i, i, i." "bǐ" "mǐ" "u." When you pronounce "u" protrude your lips forward and tighten them into a circle. "u, u, u." "bù" "fú" "fú" means fortune. We put this on our front door during spring festival for good luck.

Skip to 3 minutes and 30 seconds"ü" When you pronounce "ü" there are two main steps. Do you still remember i" So step one, pronounce "i". Step two, keep your tongue in the same position, and meanwhile form your lips into a circle like "u" "ü". "ü" "ü" "ü" "yǔ(ǚ)" "yú(ǘ)" Now, can you read these simple finals? Sure. "a" "o" "e" "i" "u" "ü" Good job. Now let's have a quick review of the initials and finals we've learned. "b" "p" "m" "f" "a" "o." "e" "i" "u" "ü" Wow, I've really learned a lot. So now practice is up to you. There will be more initials waiting for you in the next video. Bye-bye.

Six Simple Finals

There are six simple finals in Pinyin: a o e i u ü.

Finals are behind the initials. They should be pronounced with more power than initials.

Here are tips of how to pronounce the six simple finals.

  • ɑ. Open your mouth wide and relax your tongue naturally.
  • o. Round your lips, and open it a little bit, and move your tongue back slightly.
  • e. It’s similar to the phonetic sound /3:/ in the British English word “bird”, but don’t widen your mouth too much.
  • i. Open your mouth wider and keep your teeth aligned.
  • u. When you pronounce u, protrude your lips forward, and tighten them into a circle.
  • ü. When you pronounce ü, there are two main steps. Step one, pronounce i. Step two, keep your tongue in the same position while forming your lips into a circle like u.

After learning tones and initials, you can combine them with the final a to form a syllable. For example, (father). We pronounce the initial b lightly, and quickly move on to the final a. Then the final should be pronounced fully and loudly. From the video, we however know that not all initials and finals can be combined together. Here, e cannot be put with b p m f. But the final itself can be one syllable.

For example, “è” means “hungry”, “Wǒ è le.”means “I’m hungry”. “Nǐ è ma?” means “Are you hungry?” Click to listen

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Introduction to Chinese: Pronunciation and Tone

Shanghai International Studies University (SISU)

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